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Author Topic: How common are personality disorders?  (Read 32735 times)
MaybeSo
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« Reply #20 on: February 19, 2013, 05:37:08 PM »

Many people in our culture today likely have borderline or narcisstic traits to a degree that is less than optimal, and moreso than in past history, from what I can see, our current culture is pretty borderline eg., we are emotionally immature especially as it pertains to ideas about intimate relating.

We live in an instant gratification culture: We are weaned to expect instant and sustained happiness  we put the kids in daycare asap so we can work and be fulfilled and have more stuff,  we feel entitled to great big houses, great big lives, porn star sex, we want to live the life of a 20 year old in our 40's and 50's and this culture spends huge amounts of money on fantasy based pursuits including pornorgraphy, hollywood movies and plastic surgery...   our idols are caricatures on drama saturated reality TV shows and hollywood movie stars with revolving drama-based relationships...   we don't connect eye to eye or really even converse anymore, we text or sext or hook-up online like finding a partner and relating is as simple as putting a nickle into the never ending gum-ball machine...   the list goes on and on.

Both men and women (US) are raised and marinated in this culture of instant gratification; many of us probably do not in FACT meet the clincial criteria for 5 out of 9 symptoms (DSM IV) of a Borderline Personality Disorder, probably many of those we dated and talked about here don't either...   but please don't be fooled that if you DON'T have a clincial personality disorder that you actually have excellent and flexible adult emotional skills, good boundaries, are able to defer gratification and have grown up, reasonable and healthy expectations about what an intimate relationship provides long-term.  You can fall way far away from an actual clinical personality disorder and STILL be a difficult relating partner long term (traits) and we are all hooking up and dating eachother folks, all of us with our 'traits'...   we don't need to look any further than in the mirror to see dysfunction...   especially in today's culture which doens't even PROMOTE healthy adult relating in any meangingful way in mainstream culture...   why bother when you can become rich AND get your "needs" met instantly with online porn and all the little girls growing up are trying so hard to meet that fantasy standard?  That is not a healthy society for men or women.

We are part of a pretty unhealthy time in our culture overall...   in my opinion, WE are currently living in a borderline culture.  
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« Reply #21 on: February 19, 2013, 06:11:54 PM »

According to "I Hate You, Don't Leave Me" (written in the 80's mind you)...  

"For many, American culture has lost contact with the past and remains unconnected to the future. Our flooding of technical advancement and information requires greater individual commitment to solitary study and practice, thus sacrificing opportunities for socialization. Increasing divorce rates, expanding use of day care, and greater mobility have all contributed to a society that lacks constancy and reliability. Personal, intimate relationships become difficult or even impossible to achieve, and deep-seated loneliness, self-absorption, emptiness, anxiety, depression, and loss of self-esteem ensue." - Page 63

We are a borderline culture in meeting some but not all of the criteria...   not enough for actual diagnosis.
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« Reply #22 on: February 20, 2013, 04:06:09 PM »

In regards of the discussion about modern american culture being more prone to BPD, I would like to add a little of my recent discoveries. I have learned that many of the relationships in my family had some dysfunction going as far back as great grandfather generation, further knowledge is not available. In my culture we have strong connection to the past, so the stories are around. From what I can gather I think BPD problems have existed for a loong time. But time and history has a tendency to just keep the "good" parts. Just feel the tendency in your own self when looking at your relationship and wanting back smiley. I have to make an effort to remember the bad stuff that happened and still it gets  hidden away in my head, can't remember much of the raging fights I had with my ex. As you all know, there are not many people who can relate unless they have been in a BPD or other pd relationship, and also the shame connected to this kind of situation in the past where it was maybe more important to keep the mask, does insure that these kind of stories does not stay around for a long time. When I am done with this I will not speak about this unless I encounter some friend that needs help, and be able to validate him or her. I don't think BPD is limited to culture or modern times. It is just that the past seems so much better because we as people only remember the good bits. 
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GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

This board is intended for general questions about BPD and other personality disorders, trait definitions, and related therapies and diagnostics. Topics should be formatted as a question.

Please do not host topics related to the specific pwBPD in your life - those discussions should be hosted on an appropraite [L1] - [L4] board.

You will find indepth information provided by our senior members in our workshop board discussions (click here).

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« Reply #23 on: February 20, 2013, 11:43:41 PM »

Mountaineagle,

You make a good point and I do not think our current culture with it's emphasis on adolescence  is the only time in history where a borderline or unhealthy way of thinking was emphasized...   personality disorders are assumed to have been around for as long as groups of people have been around, some researchers certainly speculate about  times in history that represent particularly unhealthy group psychology or self destructive group think...   Alexander the Great, the Roman Empire, and Nazi Germany are just a few obvious  examples that come to mind.
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« Reply #24 on: February 21, 2013, 10:42:48 AM »

I see attachment disorganized relational styles everywhere. In the US, there is a collapse of accessibility to job security, food security, housing security, safety security. And since the family is smaller and more scattered, everything above is exasterbated. Hispanic and Asian populations often have more solid family structures, and this may explain the lesser incidence of BPD in these groups.
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heartandwhole
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« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2013, 05:58:30 AM »

That may be one factor - who chooses to come here for help.

The article you cite refers to how many men and women are diagnosed with BPD.  That's not quite the same thing as how many men and women have BPD.  Other studies have shown that it's about equal, but women are more likely to be diagnosed than men are;  that is, there are more men who have it but haven't been diagnosed.

One possible reason for that is that when someone enters adulthood and their behavior is no longer excusable - it's not a kid throwing a fit - women are more likely to go toward behavioral health treatment - medication and/or talk-therapy - either because they choose to or because someone else pushes them.  Men are more likely to go into the criminal justice system.  Unfortunately those two systems don't overlap much;  if you are getting help you are less likely to commit serious crimes, and if you are in jail you probably won't get treatment.

So it's a fork in the road - maybe just as many men as women coming to that fork but more men taking the "jail" road and more women taking the "treatment" road.

Here is a recent review of studies that seems to support your ideas, Matt: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3115767/

"Zanarini et al. examined Axis II comorbidity in patients with BPD according to gender in 1998. According to their findings, the rates of avoidant and dependent personality disorders were similar for both genders. However, men with BPD were significantly more likely to have comorbid paranoid, passive-aggressive, narcissistic, sadistic, and antisocial personality disorders. In support of these data, in the previously noted study by Tadic et al. (2009), researchers also found a higher frequency of antisocial personality disorder in men compared with women (57% vs. 26%). Therefore, men with BPD appear to be characterized by antisocial overtones. Again, given the overload of antisocial features in the psychological styling of men with BPD, disposition in the correctional system would be more likely."

It goes on to convey that while the prevalence of BPD is roughly the same in men and women, men often express more "explosive temperaments" and "novelty seeking," whereas women display more "eating, mood, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorders."  Women are also more likely to seek therapy and pharmaceutical treatments, according to the study.
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gotbushels
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« Reply #26 on: March 16, 2016, 08:00:05 AM »

Just an update from what I found.

Re overall incidence.

K&S seems consistent with 6% overall incidence.
They use Grant, Chou, Goldstein's, 2008 results on page 5.

---

Re gender incidence bias.

First, K&S state 3:1 female:male bias.
Not cited but they probably used DSM4.

Second, K&S then go on to say "recent epidemiological research confirms that [BPD] prevalence is similar in both genders, although women enter treatment more frequently."
Pages 16-17.
Not cited. But this is suggested in Grant, Chou, Goldstein's, 2008 results, which K&S used earlier.

There is a partial discussion on the justice system as explanatory for the male-female difference on the same page.

---

K&S = Kreisman&Straus(2010) IHYDLM (Revised ed.) NY, NY: Perigree.

Grant, B. F., Chou, S. P., Goldstein, R. B., et al., 2008
s=34,000
non-clinical survey basis

DSM4 content regarding the gender incidence bias; I'm guessing are clinically based.
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« Reply #27 on: June 18, 2016, 11:56:27 AM »

I think several researchers in the past have found that women with BPD get treatment, and men with BPD go to jail.

That probably accounts for the different incidence from men to women.

If 6% is based on 3:1 women, that would be 9% among women, 3% among men...but assuming the other 6% of men are in jail, maybe it's really 9% total.

I've never seen a study that finds without any assumptions - that is, randomly checking a significant number of both men and women - a big gap in incidence.
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« Reply #28 on: June 18, 2016, 12:16:46 PM »

If 6% is based on 3:1 women...


The "6% study" is the first to conclude that the disorder is 50%/50%.

Some conclusions are:

~ the prevalence of the disorder is  5.9%

~ that prevalence in men is the same as women.

~ BPD was more prevalent among Native American men...
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« Reply #29 on: June 18, 2016, 02:31:05 PM »

If 6% is based on 3:1 women...


The "6% study" is the first to conclude that the disorder is 50%/50%.

Some conclusions are:

~ the prevalence of the disorder is  5.9%

~ that prevalence in men is the same as women.

~ BPD was more prevalent among Native American men...

Thanks - I missed that.

The Native American men I know *do* have a lot of substance abuse issues...but I haven't seen BPDish behavior...or maybe I'm overlooking it...
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