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THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY DISORDERS
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Author Topic: Epilepsy: Is there a link between epilepsy and BPD?  (Read 23541 times)
LOAnnie
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« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2010, 01:31:29 PM »

Well, thing is, its not really substantiated that there are any links at this point in time.  The possibility that there are links to other more organic disorders (like epilepsy, schizophrenia, etc.) is only a potential subject of future research studies, right now.  

However, I agree with you that the "hard sciences" such as brain research into the possibility that there are neurological, chemical, or structural components of personality disorder is a fascinating line of inquiry and (in my opinion) holds the most hope for discovering potential means of prevention, improved treatments, or even cures.

-LOAnnie


I wouldn't be surprised if more and more links are found between PD's and disorders that we find more organic.  And they seem exacerbated by stress.  There may be chemical factors too subtle to show up (at this point) but that have substantial effect on brain function.

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innerspirit
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« Reply #11 on: May 18, 2010, 11:53:13 AM »

However, I agree with you that the "hard sciences" such as brain research into the possibility that there are neurological, chemical, or structural components of personality disorder is a fascinating line of inquiry and (in my opinion) holds the most hope for discovering potential means of prevention, improved treatments, or even cures.

Well it's a hope.  My x sister-in-law was diagnosed as bipolar and was very reassured by the reasoning that adhering to her meds was for as organic a reason as a diabetic's need for insulin.  Just as an antidepressant relieves a serotin imbalance, I guess.  If there were a confirmed physical, organic component to PD's, I hope that it would relieve some of the stigma of mental illness.
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ingridp
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« Reply #12 on: May 18, 2010, 01:48:19 PM »

I agree.  smiley Not only would it reduce the social stigma, but hopefully, would force medical aids to provide more funds for the treatmentof the disorder. And just imagine the enormous hope that it would bring to all our beloved BPDs - what a joy!  messenger3

Love

xoxox

Ingrid

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innerspirit
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« Reply #13 on: May 18, 2010, 02:32:34 PM »

I agree.  smiley Not only would it reduce the social stigma, but hopefully, would force medical aids to provide more funds for the treatmentof the disorder. And just imagine the enormous hope that it would bring to all our beloved BPDs - what a joy!  messenger3

Love

xoxox

Ingrid

I read that people with epilepsy were tremendously stigmatized in the past, as pariahs of the community. 

Sometimes they were regarded as shamans (with seizures interpreted as trance-states.)

Or perhaps both.
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Mocha Java


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« Reply #14 on: May 18, 2010, 10:59:05 PM »

My uBPD father is epileptic. Really interesting info here, thanks.
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innerspirit
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« Reply #15 on: May 18, 2010, 11:05:50 PM »

My uBPD father is epileptic. Really interesting info here, thanks.

Do you see any connection between the illness and his behavior?  (As you feel comfortable in posting.)

My X went go catatonic when very stressed.  There was one time that it took several minutes for me to revive him.   I still wonder...
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Mocha Java


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« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2010, 04:46:27 PM »

Hi innerspirit,

I don't think I ever made a connection between his epilepsy and his behavior. He does tend to get mild seizures after traveling (I always chalked that up to stress).

Recently, when we were discussing something, he told me he was starting to feel "seizurey", and it turned out that the subject was making him feel depressed/waify. He got up and walked out of the room. So that's kind of interesting.
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"The hardest thing in life is to know which bridge to cross and which to burn."
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« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2010, 04:10:52 PM »

As noted by Dr. Heller's (an MD) various articles on the website linked above (Biological Unhappiness) as I have read several of them to date as well, he believes that there may be a potential link between BPD and damaged amygdalas (two almond sized glands in the center of the brain which are known as the "fear and stress center").

In addition, the excellent BPD video entitled "Back from the Edge" which is being promoted here on BPD Family, there are some doctors interviewed in that same film who discuss the potential links between damaged amgydalas and BPD. When your amygdalas are damaged, your emotions tend to be adversely affected according to many doctors.

I have read at least 20 other articles myself (written by experienced doctors) who also believe that damaged amygdalas may be part of the reason why someone has BPD, Autism, Asperger's, and even Epilepsy so this post may be on to something here.
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PotentiallyKevin
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« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2010, 05:50:35 PM »

I have read numerous studies on this, and there seems to be a huge correlation between the two. My BPDexgf's BPDmother had seizures when she was under enough stress. I don't think that having epilepsy = automatically having BPD, but there is way too much coincidence to not look into this. One therapist I know, is convinced that epilepsy has a lot more to do with emotional regulation than we think, even though most professionals believe that it is strictly a neurological problem.
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4. Something possessing the capacity for growth or development.
AMust
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« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2010, 07:01:31 PM »

This is a very interesting thread.  My uBPDh has temporal lobe seizures due to a tumor on his temporal lobe that is unoperable due to its location by an artery.  I've often wondered if it, along with brain damage that was verified by a SPECT test, has contributed to his BPD.  His tumor is located deep inside, by the amydala.  He was scheduled to get an MRI to send to UCLA to find out if he would be a candidate for Cyberknife surgery but he doesn't bother and cancels appointments.  Apparently, he's not interested.  Doesn't he want to get better?  Surely, no one in their right mind would want to continue living like that (with all the BPD stuff).  The connection with the amydala is interesting since it is involved in a wide range of behavior function and psychiatric conditions.  That could be the connection.  I'll have to look at the SPECT results and check out the amydala.  We might have something here.
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