Home page of BPDFamily.com, online relationship supportMember registration here
August 16, 2017, 08:11:19 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Administrator: heartandwhole
Moderators: Meili, once removed
Member support team: DaddyBear77, gotbushels, marti644, Tattered Heart, Turkish, wendydarling, Woolspinner2000
  Directory Guidelines Glossary   Boards   Help Please Donate Login Register  
THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY DISORDERS
26
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Why do pwBPD sometime speak with a childlike voice?  (Read 34478 times)
enlighten me
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 3123



« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2016, 05:37:52 AM »

My son who is thirteen will go into baby talk when he is uncomfortable about something. For me it seems to be his way of not being talked to harshly or too in depth. Probably learnt from the fact that when he was young he was never put on the spot as he wasnt capable of answering in an adult manner. He has been regressing a lot lately due to his mums behaviour.
Logged


zonnebloem
**
Offline Offline

Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 125


« Reply #11 on: July 24, 2016, 01:24:24 AM »

 

"My" ex BPD is very clever at laguages.
He'd pick up many dialects and he'd adjust himself. Being in Holland, he'd speak with a Dutch accent. He would not notice himself.

If he had met his ex, I could tell the way he talked, he'd copy her stressfull voice.
He also spoke with the voice of his 16-year-old and sometimes copied her behaviour.
This would very much annoy me.

He was very good in reading my face and could tell when I tried to hide my anger.
He was better in getting on with animals than with people because he is so childish naiv.
Logged
enlighten me
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 3123



« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2016, 01:35:13 AM »



"My" ex BPD is very clever at laguages.
He'd pick up many dialects and he'd adjust himself. Being in Holland, he'd speak with a Dutch accent. He would not notice himself..

I think it is normal to pick up accents just not that quick. I worked with a group of guys with a very strong regional accent and when I went home my family laughed as I was speaking like them. I guess I picked it up subconsciously to fit in and feel more accepted. To do it as quick as your ex seems to me to be more about a very unstable sense of self.
Logged
FeelingBitter
*
Offline Offline

Person in your life: Other
Posts: 89


« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2016, 12:44:21 PM »

In my experience, the baby talk/childish talk/doe eyes are whipped out when the pwBPD I know wants to manipulate someone.
Logged
woundedPhoenix
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 241


« Reply #14 on: November 30, 2016, 01:56:54 AM »

underneath everything, there is a child that never was allowed to grow up in many borderlines. And maybe also in ourselves.

So it is kind of suppressed and when we feel totally safe in a loving relationship, this part can come out.

I think deep down that was the deepest connection we shared, to really open up these young and innocent parts in ourselves.

Unfortunately, these parts are hidden beneath a lot of brokenness, and the brokenness will make sure that that connection will fail sooner or later.

Babytalk i never really experienced, i think it was more that a part of our love was a childish love, both in a good and a bad way.
Logged
Warcleods
*
Offline Offline

Person in your life: Romantic partner
Posts: 97


« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2016, 04:08:01 AM »

My ex uBPD did more of a childlike impersonation during times of emotional stress.   It wasn't very frequent but she would almost take on the role of a innocent child with the talk and expressions.  I think it was a outcry for comfort and compassion, but nonetheless, bizarre.
Logged
once removed
SITE MODERATOR
**
Online Online

Gender: Male
Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 3942



« Reply #16 on: November 30, 2016, 09:46:12 AM »

okay, ill bite.

yes my ex did this. so did several girls i have known, and its always made me cringe. yet in my relationship i found myself doing it back.

its not a "BPD thing", let alone a trait. i did wonder what it might have to do with schema modes, though, if anything.
Logged

     and I think it's gonna be all right; yeah; the worst is over now; the mornin' sun is shinin' like a red rubber ball…
DaughterOfHera


Offline Offline

Person in your life: Parent
Posts: 27



« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2017, 07:38:12 PM »

I've noticed this with my high-functioning BPD mother repeatedly in two types of situations:

1) when she's been called-out on her poor behaviours and becomes defensive, whether being "cute", or tantrum-like and stomping her foot exclaiming that this is "no fair" (or, alternatively, will talk like a politician, going all the way around the situation still not having accepted onus); and

2) when she's going into what I call her "performance mode" as she attempts to convince others (including my sister and I) that our family experiences were somehow something other than how they truly were / are.

To any outsider witnessing this, it can come across as almost comical, though my mother is dead serious when she's doing it and can leave people feeling confused as to how to react.  To me, it comes across almost as if she's regressing or becoming someone else.
Logged
Breathe066
*
Offline Offline

Person in your life: Other
Posts: 78



« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2017, 04:58:26 PM »

I babytalked to my H wBPD when times were better, and he responded in kind. Then his illness got worse and he thought it was weird, so I stopped.
Logged
Links and Information
CLINICAL INFORMATION
The Big Picture
5 Dimensions of Personality
BPD? How can I know?
Get Someone into Therapy
Treatment of BPD
Full Clinical Definition
Top 50 Questions

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENTS
My Child has BPD
My Parent/Sibling has BPD
My Significant Other has BPD
Recovering a Breakup
My Failing Romance
Endorsed Books
Archived Articles

RELATIONSHIP TOOLS
How to Stop Reacting
Ending Cycle of Conflict
Listen with Empathy
Don't Be Invalidating
Values and Boundaries
On-Line CBT Program
>> More Tools

MESSAGEBOARD GENERAL
Membership Eligibility
Messageboard Guidelines
Directory
Suicidal Ideation
Domestic Violence
ABOUT US
Mission
Policy and Disclaimers
Professional Endorsements
Wikipedia
Facebook

Google+(Member)
Google+ (Professional)
BPDFamily.org

Your Account
Settings

Moderation Appeal
Become a Sponsor
Sponsorship Account


Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2017, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!