Home page of BPDFamily.com, online relationship supportMember registration here
November 18, 2018, 05:25:36 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Board Admins: Harley Quinn, Harri, Once Removed, Radcliffwendydarling
Senior Ambassadors: Flourdust, Mutt, Turkish, Woolspinner2000
Ambassadors: BeagleGirl, bluek9, Cat Familiar, CryWolf, Enabler, Feeling Better, formflier, Insom, JNChell, Merlot, Mustbeabetterway, RolandOfEld, spero, zachira
  Help!   Groups   Please Donate Login to Post New?--Register to post Here  
PSYCHOLOGY: Help us build this database.
26
Pages: 1 ... 4 [5] 6  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: TREATMENT: EMDR Therapy  (Read 6606 times)
forgottenarm
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 875


« Reply #100 on: August 09, 2012, 05:28:18 PM »

I've been doing it too---just started three months ago---and it's incredibly potent.  Life-changing
Logged

Let life happen to you.  Believe me, life is in the right.  Always.--Rilke


DivorcedNon
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 98


« Reply #101 on: August 09, 2012, 08:56:50 PM »

My T specializes in EMDR. He never applied it on me. He says that I respond well to talk therapy although he is open to try it on me at some point. He uses it more for PTSD.

He told me about one client that was involved in a horrific accident where a family member next to her was killed by another large vehicle smashing at their car from the opposite direction runnng over the family member.  The client was unable to drive after that due to PTSD. After that one and only session of EMDR the client never came back. However, the letter from the client came after few months  in which she said that the session was "weird" but after that one session she was able to drive again and pass the place where the accident happened without being triggered!

My T said that it is hard to predict how someone will react to EMDR and sometimes reaction to EMDR is so amazing. He uses hypnosis too but he did not use it on me although I am curious about it as well.

My first wife is a T and she too uses EMDR and hypnosis successfuly for different issues as an addition to talk therapy.

Here is a rather technical yet interesting paper (link to a PDF file is at the bottom) about integrated use of talk therapy, EMDR and hypnosis:

www.hypnosisandsuggestion.org/hypnosis-and-emdr.html

Does it work for BPD? You would think it could be helpful.
Logged
forgottenarm
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 875


« Reply #102 on: August 09, 2012, 09:01:11 PM »

My T suggested it because she thought PTSD from my childhood made me more susceptible to my xBPDbf and also made detaching more difficult.  She said it's used a lot with veterans or people who experience single traumatic events, but it's also useful for chronic trauma, like you might experience in a chaotic family growing up, or even with a pwBPD.
Logged

Let life happen to you.  Believe me, life is in the right.  Always.--Rilke
nocrazy
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 223


i am.


« Reply #103 on: August 09, 2012, 09:45:28 PM »

I dont know why it is not used for BPD, although, I imagine hell would freeze over before my exH BPD/N would even be able to admit to himself the traumas, behaviors, etc, that are necessary to be aware of.

I know it is addressing single events, and long term chronic behavior in my FOO. But, I did have to do the prep work, which my T says a lot of her clients do not do, and they end up having to work longer.

Identifying the core tapes that play in your mind is fantastic to do regardless..An example: just one of mine has to do with "appearing pretty at all costs" This was something I was completely unaware of. We go into the work, and that statement unravels into the events that actually shaped the thoughts into being: Sexual abuse, being painted black by my mother if I spoke up about what was wrong.

"Appearing pretty at all cost" is a horrifying anxiety generating feeling wound. It was one of the main things that kept me where I was in my awful marriage for 10 years. I was desperate not to relive the trauma that occurred when I was deemed to be exhibiting "unpretty" behavior or lets say the opposite, pretty behavior would be ;WALKING ON EGGSHELLS.

So much. I cannot even say.

I have used several tools for this unravelling down to the core wound tapes.

One thing is radical forgiveness sheets. by colin tipping. They are free online, but an incredible tool. you can just google radical forgiveness. they have one for forgiving others, and one for SELF forgiveness. Either way, it really boils it down, (However cheezy it may be) in a concise way to a few statements.

Logged
GreenMango
Retired Staff
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 4332



« Reply #104 on: August 11, 2012, 01:35:56 PM »

Hope this helps

EMDR is touted as a breakthrough treatment for trauma/PTSD.  EMDR integrates elements of many several psychotherapies in structured protocols that are designed to maximize treatment effects. These include psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, interpersonal, experiential, and body-centered therapies. During EMDR the patient attends to past and present experiences in brief sequential doses while simultaneously focusing on an external stimulus. Then the client is instructed to let new material become the focus of the next set of dual attention. This sequence of dual attention and personal association is repeated many times in the session.  

A description of the method is located below.  

EMDR also has some detractors within the psychological community who argue it is nothing more than classic cognitive/behavioral techniques slickly repackaged and sold as a quick fix.  Evaluating EMDR - Shawn P. Cahill, Ph.D.

Interesting discussion!

Skip


-   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -  

EMDR is an information processing therapy and uses an eight phase approach.  

First Phase The first phase is a history taking session during which the therapist develops a treatment plan. Patient and therapist identify possible targets for EMDR processing. These include recent distressing events, current situations that elicit emotional disturbance, related historical incidents, and the development of specific skills and behaviors that will be needed by the client in future situations.

Second Phase During the second phase of treatment, the therapist ensures that the patient has adequate methods of handling emotional distress and good coping skills, and that the client is in a relatively stable state. If further stabilization is required, or if additional skills are needed, therapy focuses on providing these.

Phase 3-6 In phase three through six, a target is identified and processed using EMDR procedures. These involve the patient identifying the most vivid visual image related to the memory (if available), a negative belief about self, related emotions and body sensations. The patient also identifies a preferred positive belief. The validity of the positive belief is rated, as is the intensity of the negative emotions.

The patient is then instructed to focus on the image, negative thought, and body sensations while simultaneously moving his/her eyes back and forth following the therapist's fingers as they move across his/her field of vision for 20-30 seconds or more (Athough eye movements are the most commonly used external stimulus, therapists often use auditory tones, tapping, or other types of tactile stimulation). The patient is instructed to just notice whatever happens. After this, the clinician instructs the client to let his/her mind go blank and to notice whatever thought, feeling, image, memory, or sensation comes to mind.

Depending upon the client's report the clinician will facilitate the next focus of attention. In most cases a patient-directed association process is encouraged. This is repeated numerous times throughout the session. I

If there are negative sensations, these are processed as above. If there are positive sensations, they are further enhanced.

Seventh Phase In phase seven, closure, the therapist asks the patient to keep a journal during the week to document any related material that may arise and reminds the client of the self-calming activities that were mastered in phase two.

Eighth Phase The next session begins with phase eight, re-evaluation of the previous work, and of progress since the previous session.

Result After EMDR processing, clients generally report that the emotional distress related to the memory has been eliminated, or greatly decreased, and that they have gained important cognitive insights. Importantly, these emotional and cognitive changes usually result in spontaneous behavioral and personal change, which are further enhanced with standard EMDR procedures.

www.emdr.com/briefdes.htm

Logged

numenal
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 494

life is meant to be truly lived


« Reply #105 on: August 17, 2012, 05:01:08 PM »

Hi,

I've been doing EMDR for PTSD for about a year. Since people with PTSD have traumatic memories only partially processed, they are not "filed" as past, no-longer-harmful memories. EMDR accesses those memories (the bilateral stimulation allows for that), and then through the process led by the T, the person with PTSD is able to reprocess the memory in a way that takes the "trauma charge" out of it.

Depending on the severity of the trauma(s), the process may have to be repeated many times. I have found it very helpful.
Logged

"Get yourself free"
One Day at a Time
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 99



WWW
« Reply #106 on: August 17, 2012, 05:36:23 PM »

Thank you GreenMango and numenal, very helpful.

I've discussed with my T and we both see EMDR as being potentially very helpful for me in the future. I'm in the thick of a breakthrough crisis and so the focus for now is on learning to ground myself as my emotions are rather overwhelming at this point. 

With respect to my childhood bullying, I have a handful of visual memories disconnected from much emotion. And where the abuse by uBPDm is the concerned, it seems that I have nothing but huge grief and abandonment panic, but all memories (other than very vague ones), are blanked.

So, I am very interested to experience EMDR and see how all this (hopefully) comes together. One day...
Logged

What we are searching for is also searching for us.  The way is to stop.  To let ourselves be found. - Stephen Cope, The Wisdom of Yoga
numenal
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 494

life is meant to be truly lived


« Reply #107 on: August 17, 2012, 05:49:13 PM »

Once you do a few sessions, you might find deeper memories accessed. EMDR can go layer by layer, providing you trust your T and relax into it.
Logged

"Get yourself free"
Parrot Pill
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 70


« Reply #108 on: September 17, 2012, 12:00:53 PM »

I did EMDR a couple of years ago after a car accident triggered PTSD from earlier trauma. Because my traumatic events were

Acute rather than chronic my therapy was quite focused and took only a few sessions. I was amazed by how effective it was for me, tho my regular therapist (not my EMDR t) cautioned me that it doesn't work for everyone. However, for those it does work for it can be amazing. Good luck!
Logged
Cheshire
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Person in your life: Parent
Posts: 153


« Reply #109 on: November 22, 2012, 04:54:52 AM »

I'm going to start EMDR therapy this month. Eye Movement Desensitization Response is a treatment for PTSD. Thoughts?
Logged

"I growl when I'm happy and purr when I'm sad. I rightly conclude I must be mad."  - Cheshire Cat

"Your gone, gone, gone away; I watched you disappear.  All that's left is a ghost of you."  - Monsters & Men, "Little Talks"
Want2know
Retired Staff
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Person in your life: Parent
Posts: 5049



WWW
« Reply #110 on: November 22, 2012, 05:22:34 AM »

Yes, I have.  I didn't even know my therapist was doing it, but he did ask me before starting if I was willing to try something different.  It was pretty intense, and definitely had a lasting impact, one that I can draw upon today.

It started with him having me close my eyes and think of being in a dark movie theater, by myself, looking up at a blank white screen.  He then asked me to think about the situation that I was having issues with, and walk through it with him.  He told me to open my eyes and started moving his fingers slowly back and forth in front of my eyes, side to side, continuing to have me walk through the situation.  He would bring me back to the blank movie screen every so often, and then intensified his finger movement, having me think about the trauma, and finally stopped, had me think of the movie screen one more time, and then sat in silence.  I cried.

Now, if I think of sitting in a dark theater, looking at that movie screen, it brings a feeling of calm over me.  Very interesting.
Logged

“The path to heaven doesn't lie down in flat miles. It's in the imagination with which you perceive this world, and the gestures with which you honor it." ~ Mary Oliver


Cheshire
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Person in your life: Parent
Posts: 153


« Reply #111 on: November 22, 2012, 06:27:48 AM »

Thanks, want2know! I've been trying to break through a blocked memory for some time now, and my T thinks this will help. The saNPDlay is helpful, but not with this particular chunk. It feels like my memory time-codes are scrambled surrounding the event.  Nervous but hopeful. Will write after.
Logged

"I growl when I'm happy and purr when I'm sad. I rightly conclude I must be mad."  - Cheshire Cat

"Your gone, gone, gone away; I watched you disappear.  All that's left is a ghost of you."  - Monsters & Men, "Little Talks"
Want2know
Retired Staff
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Person in your life: Parent
Posts: 5049



WWW
« Reply #112 on: November 22, 2012, 06:38:46 AM »

Definitely let us know how it goes.   Doing the right thing (click to insert in post)

Be prepared for some feelings that you may not have tapped into yet - but that is a good thing.  Just go with it, and don't think too much about the process.  Focus on his fingers and your thoughts and emotions.  Let it flow. 
Logged

“The path to heaven doesn't lie down in flat miles. It's in the imagination with which you perceive this world, and the gestures with which you honor it." ~ Mary Oliver
empowered_dad
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Person in your life: Parent
Posts: 226


« Reply #113 on: November 27, 2012, 12:02:12 AM »

I've been seeing an EMDR therapist since 2006 through my ex-BPDw's ups and downs. The therapy really helped me work through 'old stuff' that I hadn't been addressing.  This really helped me become a stronger person, and ultimately I had the power to divorce my ex in 2010.

I don't know where I would be today without EMDR.  My sessions were often very powerful...life changing experience. 

Give it a try!

Logged
Cheshire
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Person in your life: Parent
Posts: 153


« Reply #114 on: December 07, 2012, 05:36:57 AM »

Had my 1st EMDR session this week. I was impressed with the effects I noticed during and after. We picked a target memory and did about 5 iterations of the eye movement and recall. I was able to retrieve more detail from the fog and it was strangely not painful. A day or two later, I tuned out during a long conversation and my mind drifted to the memory. I calmly recalled even more previously blocked details and a glimmer of insight into what it meant. Pretty cool.
Logged

"I growl when I'm happy and purr when I'm sad. I rightly conclude I must be mad."  - Cheshire Cat

"Your gone, gone, gone away; I watched you disappear.  All that's left is a ghost of you."  - Monsters & Men, "Little Talks"
Cloudy Days
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Person in your life: Romantic partner
Posts: 1070



« Reply #115 on: January 28, 2013, 02:41:51 PM »

My husband has been going to his Therapist for around 7 months now and she is wanting him to start doing EMDR for half of his sessions with her for PTSD. I know sort of what it is but I was just wondering if anyone had expeirience with their SO getting this type of Therapy along with DBT.

It seems like a silly therpy with the tapping but I am hopeful for anything to help him. I find that he seems to get sort of raw after his sessions because he's opening up old wounds. It's not uncommon for him to come home after therapy and be in a bad mood. Not really something I look forward to. Just wondering if this Therapy will have the same effect. Has anyone delt with something like this before?
Logged

It's not the future you are afraid of, it's repeating the past that makes you anxious.
Patti Jane Levin PsyD
Professional Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5


« Reply #116 on: March 16, 2013, 06:48:50 PM »

It's true, sometimes in any kind of psychotherapy people feel worse before they feel better. But EMDR is really the most gentle way I've ever known to treat trauma. I hope his therapist has done a lot of preparation work!

I'm a therapist who uses EMDR as my primary treatment psychotherapy and I've also personally had EMDR therapy for anxiety, panic, grief, and “small t” trauma. As a client, EMDR worked extremely well and also really fast. As an EMDR therapist, and in my role as a facilitator who trains other therapists in EMDR (certified by the EMDR International Assoc. and trained by the EMDR Inst, both of which I strongly recommend in an EMDR therapist) I have used EMDR successfully with panic disorders, trauma and PTSD, anxiety, depression, grief, body image, phobias, distressing memories, bad dreams and more...  

It's really crucial that the therapist spends enough time in one of the initial phases (Phase 2) in EMDR that involves preparing for memory processing or desensitization (memory processing or desensitization - phases 3-6 - is often referred to as "EMDR" which is actually an 8-phase psychotherapy). In this phase resources are "front-loaded" so that he has "floor" or "container" to help with processing the really hard stuff. In Phase 2 one learns a lot of great coping strategies and self-soothing techniques which can be used during EMDR processing or anytime one feels the need.

Grounding exercises are indispensable in everyday life, and really essential in stressful times. Anyone can use some of the techniques in Dr. Shapiro's new book "Getting Past Your Past: Take Control of Your Life with Self-Help Techniques from EMDR." Dr. Shapiro is the founder/creator of EMDR but all the proceeds from the book go to two charities: the EMDR Humanitarian Assistance Program and the EMDR Research Foundation). Anyway, the book is terrific. It's an easy read, helps you understand what's "pushing" your feelings and behavior, helps you connect the dots from past experiences to current life. Also teaches readers lots of helpful techniques that can be used immediately and that are also used during EMDR therapy to calm disturbing thoughts and feelings. This book would be helpful for you, for yourself and to help your husband through this difficult but incredibly important time.

As I’ve mentioned about Phase 2, during EMDR therapy one learns how to access a “Safe or Calm Place” which can be used at ANY TIME during EMDR processing (or on one's own) if it feels scary, or too emotional, too intense. One of the key assets of EMDR is that  the client is in control NOW, even though not during past events. Your husband NEVER need re-live an experience or go into great detail, ever! He NEVER needs to go through the entire memory. HE can decide to keep the lights (or the alternating sounds and/or tactile pulsars, or the waving hand) going, or stop them, whichever helps titrate – measure and adjust the balance or “dose“ of the processing. During EMDR processing there are regular “breaks” and one can control when and how many but the therapist should be stopping the bilateral stimulation every 25-50 passes of the lights to ask him to take a deep breath and ask him to say just a bit of what he's noticing. (The stimulation should not be kept on continuously, because there are specific procedures that need to be followed to process the memory). The breaks help keep a “foot in the present” while processing the past. Again, and I can’t say this enough, The CLIENT is IN CHARGE and has the power to make the process tolerable. And the therapist should be experienced in the EMDR techniques that help make it the gentlest and safest way to neutralize bad life experiences and build resources.

Pacing and dosing are critically important. So if you think his therapy is too intense  (and of course, if he agrees!) then it might be time to ask his therapist to go back over all the resources that should be used both IN session and BETWEEN sessions. The therapist should be using a variety of techniques to make painful processing less painful, like suggesting he turns the scene in his mind to black and white, lower the volume, or, erect a bullet-proof glass wall between him and the painful scene, or, imagine the abuser(s) speaking in a Donald Duck voice...   and so forth. There are a lot of these kinds of "interventions" that ease the processing. They are called "cognitive interweaves" that the therapist can use, and that also can help bring one's adult self's perspective into the work (or even an imaginary Adult Perspective). Such interweaves are based around issues of Safety, Responsibility, and Choice. So therapist questions like "are you safe now?" or "who was responsible? and "do you have more choices now?" are all very helpful in moving the processing along.

In addition to my therapy practice, I roam the web looking for EMDR discussions, try to answer questions about it posted by clients/patients, and respond to the critics out there. It's not a cure-all therapy. However, it really is an extraordinary psychotherapy and its results last. In the hands of a really experienced EMDR therapist, it's the most gentle way of working through disturbing experiences.

Logged


This website is designed to support, not to replace, the relationship between patient and their physician.
Janewhi

*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 18


« Reply #117 on: November 25, 2013, 08:06:08 PM »

Does anyone have first hand knowledge of a BPD being treated with EMDR? My ex (not certain if diagnosed or not) is beginning this, and I have done a little reading up on it. It sounds interesting.
Logged
Surnia
Retired Staff
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 3901



« Reply #118 on: November 25, 2013, 11:33:34 PM »

I did some search and I found a study from Germany from 2006. Yes, this sounds interesting.

Results of psychodynamically oriented trauma–focused inpatient treatment for women with complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD)

Ulrich Sachsse, Christina Vogel, Falk Leichsenring,

University of Kassel and Psychiatric State Hospital of Lower Saxony Goettingen, Germany

Goettingen and Northeim, Germany

Psychotherapy at the University of Goettingen and Clinic of Tiefenbrunn, Goettingen, Germany



"In a naturalistic outcome study, the authors evaluated the results of a specific psychodynamically oriented trauma–focused inpatient treatment for women with complex posttraumatic stress disorder and concomitant borderline personality disorder, self–mutilating behavior, and depression. At admission, the frequency of self–mutilating behavior and the amount of inpatient treatment (an average of 68 days annually) of the sample was high, characterizing this patient group as “previously therapy resistant.” Treatment outcome was assessed both at the end of treatment and in a 1–year follow–up. In comparison with a treatment–as-usual control group, the treatment program brought about significant and stable improvements both in trauma–specific symptoms (e.g. dissociation, intrusion, avoidance) and in general psychiatric symptoms (e.g., general symptom distress, frequency of self–mutilating behavior, number of hospitalizations). The frequency of inpatient treatments (hospitalizations) decreased dramatically (< 10 days annually; effect size: d = 2.88)."

Read More: www.guilfordjournals.com/doi/abs/10.1521/bumc.2006.70.2.125
Logged

“Don’t shrink. Don’t puff up. Stand on your sacred ground.”  Brené Brown
BlackandBlue
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 154


« Reply #119 on: October 09, 2014, 12:20:47 AM »

Since my break up with my exBPDgf back in March I've been in therapy. Most of what I have been doing so far has been I guess considered cbt. But today I start working a little bit with emdr (eye moment desensitizing and reprocessing). It's something I've wanted to try for years but haven't been able to find a therapist who offers it until now. As a child I suffered abuse from an older brother and I feel it was a contributing factor to why Ive always had such low confidence and self esteem and ultimately turn me into the codependent I am today. I'm also hoping to use it for the trauma I faced with my. Have any of you guys done any emdr stuff?. If so, what are your expirences?
Logged
Patti Jane Levin PsyD
Professional Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5


« Reply #120 on: October 09, 2014, 06:16:27 AM »

In EMDR therapy, it’s really crucial that a professionally trained therapist spends enough time in one of the initial phases (Phase 2) that involves preparing for memory processing or desensitization (memory processing or desensitization – phases 3-6 – is often referred to as “EMDR” which is actually an 8-phase psychotherapy). In this phase resources are “front-loaded” so that you have a “floor” or “container” to help with processing the really hard stuff. In Phase 2 you learn a lot of great coping strategies and self-soothing techniques which you can use during EMDR processing or anytime you feel the need. So if you start feeling overwhelmed or that it’s too intense, you can ground yourself (with your therapist’s help in session, and on your own between sessions) and feel safe enough to continue the work. While EMDR therapy (any any efficacious treatment for trauma) does not go “digging” for buried memories, sometimes memory does become more clear, and related memories emerge which can then become targets of their own for EMDR processing.

Grounding exercises are indispensable in everyday life, and really essential in stressful times. Anyone can use some of the techniques in Dr. Shapiro’s new book “Getting Past Your Past: Take Control of Your Life with Self-Help Techniques from EMDR.” Dr. Shapiro is the founder/creator of EMDR but all the proceeds from the book go to two charities: the EMDR Humanitarian Assistance Program and the EMDR Research Foundation). Anyway, the book is terrific. It’s an easy read, helps you understand what’s “pushing” your feelings and behavior, helps you connect the dots from past experiences to current life. Also teaches readers lots of helpful techniques that can be used immediately and that are also used during EMDR therapy to calm disturbing thoughts and feelings.

As I’ve mentioned about Phase 2, during EMDR therapy you learn coping strategies and self-soothing techniques that you can use during EMDR processing or anytime you feel the need. You learn how to access a “Safe or Calm Place” which you can use at ANY TIME during EMDR processing (or on your own) if it feels scary, or too emotional, too intense. It can also be a place of comfort, or courage, or strength, if it's hard to imagine a safe or calm place. One of the key assets of EMDR is that YOU, the client, are in control NOW, even though you likely were not during past events. You NEVER need re-live an experience or go into great detail, ever! You NEVER need to go through the entire memory. YOU can decide to keep the lights (or the alternating sounds and/or tactile pulsars, or the waving hand) going, or stop them, whichever helps titrate – measure and adjust the balance or “dose“ of the processing. During EMDR processing there are regular “breaks” and you can control when and how many but the therapist should be stopping the bilateral stimulation every 25-50 passes of the lights to ask you to take a deep breath and ask you to say just a bit of what you’re noticing. (The stimulation should not be kept on continuously, because there are specific procedures that need to be followed to process the memory). The breaks help keep a “foot in the present” while you’re processing the past. Again, and I can’t say this enough, YOU ARE IN CHARGE so YOU can make the process tolerable. And your therapist should be experienced in the EMDR techniques that help make it the gentlest and safest way to neutralize bad life experiences and build resources.

Pacing and dosing are critically important. So if you ever feel that EMDR processing is too intense then it might be time to go back over all the resources that should be used both IN session and BETWEEN sessions. Your therapist should be using a variety of techniques to make painful processing less painful, like suggesting you turn the scene in your mind to black and white, lower the volume, or, erect a bullet-proof glass wall between you and the painful scene, or, imagine the abuser speaking in a Donald Duck voice… and so forth. There are a lot of these kinds of “interventions” that ease the processing. They are called “cognitive interweaves” that your therapist can use, and that also can help bring your adult self’s perspective into the work (or even an imaginary Adult Perspective). Such interweaves are based around issues of Safety, Responsibility, and Choice. So therapist questions like “are you safe now?” or “who was responsible? and “do you have more choices now?” are all very helpful in moving the processing along.

DBT is considered the best treatment for BPD. However, that said, EMDR is also excellent for BPD so if I were you, I'd do both. They work well together.

I’m a therapist who uses EMDR as my primary treatment psychotherapy and I’ve also personally had EMDR therapy for anxiety, panic, grief, and “small t” trauma. As a client, EMDR worked extremely well and also really fast. As an EMDR therapist, and in my role as a facilitator who trains other therapists in EMDR (certified by the EMDR International Assoc. and trained by the EMDR Institute, both of which I strongly recommend in an EMDR therapist) I have used EMDR successfully with panic disorders, single incident trauma and complex/chronic PTSD, anxiety, depression, grief, body image, phobias, distressing memories, birth trauma, bad dreams and more…In addition to my therapy practice, I roam the web looking for EMDR discussions, try to answer questions about it posted by clients/patients, and respond to the critics out there. It’s not a cure-all therapy. However, it really is an extraordinary psychotherapy and its results last. In the hands of a really experienced EMDR therapist, it’s the most gentle way of working through disturbing experiences.

Logged


This website is designed to support, not to replace, the relationship between patient and their physician.


Ivaros

*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18



« Reply #121 on: October 09, 2014, 10:41:30 AM »

I'm a very skeptic person. Especially when it comes to this kind of therapy.

However, it worked. It changed me in a positive way. Alot more confidence and closed off bad situations ( Like having a relationship with someone who suffers from BPD )

I recommend it to everyone.
Logged

There comes a point in your life when you realize who matters, who never did, and who always will.
JaneStorm
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 273



« Reply #122 on: December 14, 2015, 05:17:27 PM »

Does anyone know about this technique as a self-help option? This is for me, not him.

www.emdr.com/product/getting-past-your-past-cd/

Thanks!

JS
Logged

"You are the love of my life
You are the love of my life
You were the love of my life
This time we know, we know
It's over..."
Thin Line - Macklemore
UnforgivenII
****
Offline Offline

Person in your life: Ex-romantic partner
Posts: 308



« Reply #123 on: August 08, 2016, 05:32:50 AM »

Ok. This morning I had my first appointment.
He is fat, short, no hair, big smile.

As soon as I sit down, he watches me...and fetches his box of paper tissues and gives it to me. The floods started :-)

He agrees with me. EMDR is the right approach. But he thinks it will be necessary to add other strategies too.
He told me to cry. To cry for a big fat month. Then I will get tired of it. Before I can get angry I must cry, mourn my project with him.
Then he promised me I will be in another place in ten weeks.
And I believe him.

I promised to write him a letter anytime I feel overwhelmed and oppressed. And to bring my letters to him. We will tear them up together.
He asked me to stop trying to understand, as difficult as it is. "Ambiguity has no answers to any question" he said.

I want to get stronger for the moment he comes back. All I want is spitting my ex in the face. "This is a good plan" My therapist smiled.

We have not started EMDR we will when he has enough information.

Knowing my therapist is with me is empowering. I think I found the right one.

Hope it helps someone.

By the way. I asked him":)id my ex really want me to go with another man?"
He answered"Yes. In that moment."
Logged
married21years
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Person in your life: Romantic partner
Posts: 609



« Reply #124 on: August 08, 2016, 05:37:47 AM »

well done this is great  , have been reading this is a therapy used in CPTSD.

be interested to find out how it goes.  Doing the right thing (click to insert in post) 
Logged
Links and Information
CLINICAL INFORMATION
The Big Picture
5 Dimensions of Personality
BPD? How can I know?
Get Someone into Therapy
Treatment of BPD
Full Clinical Definition
Top 50 Questions

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENTS
My Child has BPD
My Parent/Sibling has BPD
My Significant Other has BPD
Recovering a Breakup
My Failing Romance
Endorsed Books
Archived Articles

RELATIONSHIP TOOLS
How to Stop Reacting
Ending Cycle of Conflict
Listen with Empathy
Don't Be Invalidating
Values and Boundaries
On-Line CBT Program
>> More Tools

MESSAGEBOARD GENERAL
Membership Eligibility
Messageboard Guidelines
Directory
Suicidal Ideation
Domestic Violence
ABOUT US
Mission
Policy and Disclaimers
Professional Endorsements
Wikipedia
Facebook

BPDFamily.org

Your Account
Settings

Moderation Appeal
Become a Sponsor
Sponsorship Account


Pages: 1 ... 4 [5] 6  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2018, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!