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THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY DISORDERS
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Author Topic: What is the cause of Borderline Personality Disorder?  (Read 34981 times)
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« Reply #50 on: April 17, 2015, 09:24:26 AM »

Interesting discussion

Skip just referenced this research The National Institute of Mental Health's on the cause of BPD, which suggests that the causes are 42% genetic and 58% environmental.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17988414

Livednlearned from what you're saying Blaise Aguirre pretty much inverts this ratio between nature and nurture. Is he basing his conclusions on more recent research?

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« Reply #51 on: April 17, 2015, 09:42:39 AM »

I think the answer to "nature or nurture" is "some times nature, sometimes nurture".

Judith Herman at Harvard would like to see the "nurture" induced BPD characterized as Complex PTSD.

Livednlearned from what you're saying Blaise Aguirre pretty much inverts this ratio between nature and nurture. Is he basing his conclusions on more recent research?

I'm going to guess it the same data and one of us here quoted it wrong.
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« Reply #52 on: April 17, 2015, 10:03:20 AM »

Thanks Skip,

I followed your link which confirmed that the statistic you quoted , 42% genetics / heritability 58% environment.

I've just come across some videos of Gunderson and Scott Wilson talking at a conference in 2008 and they appear to support Livednlearned ratio - Wilson says genetics  50%-60% responsible.

Quite a big difference between these two

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« Reply #53 on: April 17, 2015, 10:12:12 AM »

I checked Blaise Aguirre's book -- the second edition, which came out in Sept 2014. He writes,

"Most researchers consider BPD to be 60 percent genetic and 40% environmental." He also refers to what he says is "the largest studies on BPD and genetics" and writes, "...  genes accounted for 69 percent of the symptoms of BPD and that environmental factors accounted for 31%."

If it is 50/50 nature/nurture, or 60/40, or 40/60, I'm wondering what difference that makes to people?

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« Reply #54 on: April 17, 2015, 10:33:31 AM »

I'm wondering what difference that makes to people?

Thanks for the quote, livednlearned, we can add this to our data sources.

What is the practical benefit of this information to a parent or relationship partner? I think it is helpful for parents from a guilt perspective.  I think it is helpful for a relationship partner who is see's traits but knows that the family was not neglectful or abusive.  For these applications, 60%:40% or 40%:60% aren't significantly different.

Here is the work:

The general BPD factor was substantially influenced by genetic factors, with a heritability of 55%. This finding is similar to the heritability estimates in the above-mentioned twin studies, which were 60% and 51%, and in the family study by Gunderson et al3 (43.9% or 58.6%, depending on method of assessment). The heritability estimates in all of these studies are higher than what has been reported from studies using dimensional representations of DSM-IV personality disorders5 or sum scores of questionnaire items.4 This difference is probably due to the fact that the effects of measurement error are largely eliminated by examination of a common factor.




JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Nov; 70(11): 1206–1214.

doi:  10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.1944

Structure of Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for Symptoms of DSM-IV Borderline Personality Disorder

Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud, MD, PhD, Eivind Ystrom, PhD, Michael C. Neale, PhD, Steven H. Aggen, PhD, Suzanne E. Mazzeo, PhD, Gun Peggy Knudsen, PhD, Kristian Tambs, PhD, Nikolai O. Czajkowski, PhD, and Kenneth S. Kendler, MD, JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Nov; 70(11): 1206–1214. , PMCID: PMC3927987, NIHMSID: NIHMS526980

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3927987/
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« Reply #55 on: April 17, 2015, 10:42:03 AM »

Thanks Livednlearned,

I think there's a lot of people out there, parents, partners, ex partners, siblings and offspring who are all very interested in knowing the extent to which nature and nurture cause BPD for understandable reasons.

It's clear that you've researched this yourself and you mentioned the breakdown in your previous post so I assume you felt that it was relevant too.

For my part I spent a big chunk of my life in a relationship with someone who I think is very likely BPD.

That relationship had a big impact on me and understanding the factors that shaped her and our relationship helps me to process it in a healthier way.

Understanding better helps me to be more compassionate to myself and her

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« Reply #56 on: April 17, 2015, 10:52:47 AM »

It does help me make sense of things to know whether there is a genetic component, although the degree or percentage to which heredity affects BPD or anything my son might have would probably not change how I think about the nurture piece. That is the only part I control. If BPD was 90 percent genetic and 10 percent environmental, I would continue to do what I'm doing, establishing a validating environment and making therapy a priority.

When I read the article about genetics and depression, it did relieve some guilt for me, although certainly not all. When I read about the chances of a child with a BPD parent developing BPD, that seems to fan my fears.


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« Reply #57 on: April 17, 2015, 05:40:47 PM »

Thanks for sharing Livednlearned,

I'm not a parent, but I thought your post on the other thread impressive and inspiring.

"With my son, my approach is to focus on creating the most validating environment I can. This change has been the most critically important part of treatment for S13. I cannot change his genetic predisposition, and I cannot give him a nuclear family with a mentally stable father. I had to examine validation with a microscope, right down to the choice of words, right down to the level of authenticity and intention I use in my voice when using validation. Doing this required deep change. My T and my son's psychiatrist both talked about how uncomfortable change is, and how many roadblocks and obstacles exist psychologically when it comes to changing family dynamics and interaction patterns. "

I've found deep change very hard and at times I get very frustrated at my stop start progress. Reading your words really helped to remind me why it's so worthwhile and that it's possible

Thanks

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