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THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY DISORDERS
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Author Topic: BPD: What is it? How can I tell?  (Read 87273 times)
Sadanty


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« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2009, 09:22:45 PM »

 

I ran into the following description :

Arntz and colleagues developed a list of 20 BPD assumptions based on the writings of Beck et al. (1990) combined with their own clinical experience with this population (Arntz, Dietzel & Dreessen, 1999). Similar to the themes proposed by Young and colleagues, the BPD assumptions Arntz, Dietzel and Dreessen (1999) proposed reflected themes of aloneness (e.g., “I will always be alone”), dependency (e.g., “I can’t manage it by myself, I need someone I can fall back on”), unlovability (e.g., “If others get to know me, they will find me rejectable and will not be able to love me”), emptiness (e.g., “I don’t really know what I want”), lack of personal control (e.g., “I can’t discipline myself”), badness (e.g., “I am an evil person and I need to be punished for it”), interpersonal distrust (e.g., “Other people are evil and abuse you”) and vulnerability (e.g., “I’m powerless and vulnerable and I can’t protect myself”). Many of the assumptions included in the Personality Disorder Belief Questionnaire (PDBQ) by Arntz et al. (1999) were drawn with permission directly from the list of beliefs in the appendix of Beck et al. (1990). However, they also included some additional assumptions that they observed in BPD patients. Arntz et al. (1999) found that patients with BPD scored higher on the PDBQ than patients with cluster-C personality disorders or normal controls.



Reference: A.C. Butler et al. / Behaviour Research and Therapy 40 (2002) 1231–1240

From the same paper:

The PBQ (Personality Disorder Questionnaire) was developed as a clinical measure of the beliefs associated with personality disorders, as proposed by Beck et al. (1990). The PBQ is composed of 126 items and nine scales (with 14 items per scale) that assess the following personality disorders: Avoidant, Dependent, Obsessive Compulsive, Histrionic, Passive–Aggressive, Narcissistic, Paranoid, Schizoid and Antisocial. Beck et al. (2001) found that patients diagnosed with Avoidant, Dependent, Obsessive Compulsive, Narcissistic or Paranoid Personality Disorder scored higher on their respective PBQ scales than on PBQ scales designed to assess the beliefs of other personality disorders. In addition, patients with Avoidant, Dependent, Narcissistic and Paranoid personality disorders scored higher on their corresponding PBQ scale than patients with other diagnoses scored on those scales.



and


Several of the beliefs associated with BPD patients appear to be not only dysfunctional, but contradictory as well. This internal dissonance may further contribute to the maladaptive behavior and distressed affective state exhibited by many BPD patients. For example, a patient with BPD may feel extremely helpless, resulting in a variety of dependent behaviors, while simultaneously experiencing distrust, particularly in close or intimate relationships.

According to the cognitive theory of BPD, these diametrically opposing beliefs are latent until they are activated by an external event. The patient then processes information in a dichotomous way, which creates anxiety, frustration, depression, or shame. In order to relieve this internal tension temporarily, the patient may behave in an extreme and self-destructive manner such as attempting suicide, binge eating, self-mutilating, or engaging in substance abuse. BPD patients also may act out against others in an attempt to punish them for perceived betrayal or withholding of what is needed. Self-punitive and other-punitive behaviors may occur in close temporal proximity in BPD. Schema formulations of BPD refer to this erratic alternating behavior as schema flipping (Young, 2002).

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Marney


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« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2009, 07:21:34 AM »

Wow!  Thanks for this information - the contradictary stuff always did my head in.  eg. Blaming others but also blaming himself at the same time.  The word 'punitive' got to me as well.  I always felt like any arguements we had wouldn't be solved until he felt either that I'd been punished or that he'd punished himself. ?
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Desert
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« Reply #12 on: July 05, 2009, 09:48:07 AM »

Quote from: Skip


The Personality Disorder Beliefs Questionnaire (PDBQ)

The following 20 "beliefs" have been the most commonly associated with those diagnosed with BPD:

11. If someone fails to keep a promise, that person can no longer be trusted.

How ironic.  The one thing about my ex that was completely predictable was she was virtually certain to renege on her word. 

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Skip
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« Reply #13 on: July 06, 2009, 08:56:06 AM »

This is from our web site... and may be helpful for those trying to understand BPD or if someone has the disorder.



https://bpdfamily.com/bpdresources/nk_a102.htm

Diagnostic Tests

Commonly used assessment tests that may help you identify "BPD thinking" include the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-II), and the Personality Disorder Beliefs Questionnaire (PDBQ). There are rating tests such as the Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder (ZAN-BPD), and the McLean Screening Instrument for Borderline Personality Disorder (MSI-BPD).

In addition there are some free, informal tests available - some bpdfamily.com members have found that these tests are helpful.

Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-II)

The Structured Clinical Interview (now SCID-II) was formulated in 1997 by First, Gibbon, Spitzer, Williams, and Benjamin. It closely follows the language of the DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders criteria. There are 12 groups of questions corresponding to the 12 personality disorders. The scoring is either the trait is absent, subthreshold, true, or there is "inadequate information to code". SCID-II can be self administered or administered by third parties (a spouse, an informant, a colleague) and yield decent indications of the disorder. The questionnaire is available from the American Psychiatric Publishing ($60.00).

Personality Disorder Beliefs Questionnaire (PDBQ).

The Personality Disorder Beliefs Questionnaire (PDBQ) is a brief self administered test for Personality Disorder tendencies. We have included a list of questions most often answered as "yes" by people with Borderline Personality Disorder .


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lbjnltx
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« Reply #14 on: July 06, 2009, 09:41:06 AM »

hello friends,

2 months ago i gave this list to our t.  out of the blue on thurs. he pulled it out and had my d answer each one.  then he began to discuss and verify her written responses.  he only got to about #8 when time ran out. 

at the earliest date possible i will get a copy of her responses and see where we are in her beliefs to date.  we are experiencing alot of progress/change at this time 33 days without a rage. yea!

i will suggest to t that we revisit questions at intervals so that we can see what we need to work on and where we have been victorious.

keep believing in miracles,

lbjnltx
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Skip
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« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2009, 09:26:31 AM »

Commonly used assessment tests that may help you identify "BPD thinking" include the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-II), and the Personality Disorder Beliefs Questionnaire (PDBQ). There are rating tests such as the Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder (ZAN-BPD), and the McLean Screening Instrument for Borderline Personality Disorder (MSI-BPD).

In addition there are some free, informal tests available - some bpdfamily.com members have found that these tests are helpful.



Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-II)


The Structured Clinical Interview (now SCID-II) was formulated in 1997 by First, Gibbon, Spitzer, Williams, and Benjamin. It closely follows the language of the DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders criteria. There are 12 groups of questions corresponding to the 12 personality disorders. The scoring is either the trait is absent, subthreshold, true, or there is "inadequate information to code". SCID-II can be self administered or administered by third parties (a spouse, an informant, a colleague) and yield decent indications of the disorder. The questionnaire is available from the American Psychiatric Publishing ($60.00).

Personality Disorder Beliefs Questionnaire (PDBQ).

The Personality Disorder Beliefs Questionnaire (PDBQ) is a brief self administered test for Personality Disorder tendencies. We have included a list of questions most often answered as "yes" by people with Borderline Personality Disorder .

More...

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l bo


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« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2010, 09:16:50 AM »

My exBDPgf is very high functioning and I didn't know what was going on or reasons for some of the odd behavior I experienced. Luckily someone pointed out it could be BDP, never heard of it and as I read the criteria most of it fit. Then I could recognize all the red flags I saw but didn't recognize at the time. I was still unsure, at times, if she really suffered from this or if I was the one going crazy. Thankfully we were only together for 10 months and haven't suffered like many on here have, I was able to get out rather quick. After a long silent treatment I mentioned BDP to her which essentially put the nail in the coffin I was looking for, haven't heard from her since and that was over a month ago.

Everyone has probably seen the 9 criteria for helping to determine BDP, I stumbled across a BDP "Personality" test and wow oh wow oh my, my ex fits MOST of these. Thought I would share if anyone else is wondering about their SO.

Does criticism from other people, even in small measure, make you feel horrible inside?

While being successful in your work life, do you feel as though a happy, successful relationship has been the one thing that's alluded you?

Would you say your emotional life has been characterized by anguish?

Have you found it hard to have close friends for very long?

Do you feel like you have less friends than those around you?

Do you tend to, at first, over idealize people and later often feel let down by them?

Have you ever been accused of behaving in ways that are all or nothing with nothing in between?

Have you taken on the values, habits and preferences of people, institutions, religions or philosophies, only to regret this decision later?

Have you experienced intense episodes of sadness, irritability, and anxiety or panic attacks?

Have you often felt raw? exhausted? in despair?

Do you have trouble sleeping?

Have you experienced chronic feelings of emptiness? Have you experienced a physical manifestation of this in your stomach or chest?

Do you have trouble being alone?

Have you experienced intense relationships?

Do you feel like other people's emotional needs are too great?

Have you felt depleted from giving it your all to relationships?

Have you felt like since you've given it all to relationships and they haven't worked, that your only choice for sanity and balance is to not be in a relationship?

Do you often feel lonely even when you are in a relationship?

Do you consciously or unconsciously fear being abandoned?

Do you seem to require more time with your partner than those you observe around you?

Does your partner accuse you of having a double standard about the relationship?

Have you said you feel "unsafe" in your relationship?

Do you feel like your partner isn't telling you everything?

Have you ever experienced an overpowering feeling that your partner was keeping things from you? Has your partner expressed feeling falsely accused of doing or saying things?

Do social engagements and vacations often end up in turmoil?

Do you feel a strong need for control?

Are you often afraid that the world is going to cave in on you... that your life is going to collapse if you aren't in control of everything?

Have you demonstrated outbursts in your most intimate relationships that seemed very appropriate at the time but you regretted later?

Have you suffered from intense bouts of anger that last for hours, maybe even a few days?

Are your expressions of anger sometimes followed by shame and guilt?

Do you ever feel shameful?

After a relationship has ended, have you felt like you're experiencing Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome?

Do you feel like any contact with that person causes you too much stress?

Have you ever cut someone off and refused to speak to them?

Have you continued to refuse contact no matter how hard they try to reach you?

Do you use alcohol or drugs to soothe your emotional pain?

Do you have, or has anyone suggested you have, an eating disorder?

Have you been known to spend too much, eat too much, be sexually promiscuous, or drive too fast?

Have others commented or complained you work too much?

Has anyone ever accused you of being paranoid?

Have you ever cut yourself?

Have you ever experienced so much emotional pain that you felt like you wanted to die?

Have you ever attempted suicide?
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JoannaK
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« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2010, 05:28:28 PM »

Do you remember where you read this, lbo?
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atwittsend
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« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2010, 05:45:05 PM »

Do you remember where you read this, lbo?

www.borderlinepersonalitysupport.com/borderline-personality-disorder.html
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JoannaK
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« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2010, 06:20:55 AM »

This list comes with a very important cavaet:

Quote
**Please note affirmative answers to the questions do not indicate a fixed conclusion. They may, however, provide you with the realization that there's a possibility you or a loved one may be a Borderline Disorder Personality. A definitive diagnosis can only be made through an evaluation by a psychiatrist or mental health care clinician who specializes in Borderline Personality Disorder. We can help you find the right professional in your area.

The only "true" test of whether or not someone has BPD is a careful examination of the person's behaviors and feelings against the nine diagnostic criteria by a trained therapist.  Almost everybody can answer "yes" to one or more of the questions in this screening device at some point in his/her life. 
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