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Author Topic: DIAGNOSIS: Middle School/High School Diagnosis  (Read 6630 times)
AustenJ
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« on: April 22, 2017, 12:12:52 PM »

I have taught both high school and middle school, and as I'm in the process of healing from the wounds of a failed BPD relationship, I was wondering at what age pwBPD begin to act out or display symptoms. I feel like most pwBPD get diagnosed in their earl 20s. My xBPDgf was diagnosed after college when she was 23; however, she did attempt suicide in college and spent a semester at in-patient treatment for purging because she thought she was fat even tho she was a triathlete. She also was, according to her, was very promiscuous in high school and college (and as an adult). She used many men in college, and ended up getting raped and being in several abusive relationships.

As a teacher, I'm curious if there have been any studies about potential early identifiers, or if any parents have identified patterns of behaviors of their borderline children.
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« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2017, 11:06:42 AM »

This is the worlds leading expert on BPD in Adolescence. It's a very good presentation.

BPD in Adolescence - Blaise Aguirre, MD


Date: Nov-2011Minutes: 41:56

BPD in Adolescence  | Blaise Aguirre, MD | NEA-BPD 2011 Meeting

About the Author
Blaise Aguirre received his medical degree from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. He completed the residency program in psychiatry at Boston University and a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at the Boston Medical Center. After completion of his residency he served as assistant training director for the Boston University Child and Adolescent Fellowship program and after that was appointed as Medical Director of the Lowell Youth Treatment Center. He has been on staff at McLean (Harvard) since 2000. He is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in psychiatry. Dr. Aguirre is experienced in child, adolescent and adult psychopharmacology and psychotherapy, including DBT. He holds an appointment as an Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Aguirre also has a small private practice where he specializes in adolescent and adult psychotherapy of Borderline Personality Disorder.
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Portent
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« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2017, 12:33:11 PM »

Sadly there is a resistance in giving an early diagnosis when treatment would be the most effective. It seems that the DSM wants them having risky sex and shooting smack before they will give diagnoses and treat.
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« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2017, 12:36:03 PM »

As a teacher, I'm curious if there have been any studies about potential early identifiers, or if any parents have identified patterns of behaviors of their borderline children.

It is my opinion that he root of most personality disorders BPD included is affect instability. Simply put people never develop the higher level emotional control of an adult and are forever emotionally a toddler. If we would simply diagnoses that one trait and do some form of cognitive behavioral therapy in adolescents and teenagers before they develop a full blown personality disorder it would do a lot of good.
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Tattered Heart
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« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2017, 02:37:38 PM »

Many psychologists will not diagnose someone under the age of 18. Not sure why or if BPD is one of those diagnoses that they wait on. The DSM requires that symptoms of BPD begins BY early adulthood (so late onset is not included).

Sometimes BPD behavior can be masked with just being a moody teenager (because aren't they all moody). I would think with teens though the moodiness would be a little more than usual and including other dangerous behaviors, such as cutting, eating disorders, hyper-moodiness, etc. You may even see it with teens not wanting to let go of broken relationships.

Children are often diagnosed early on with attachment disorder. Could these same kids grow up to be diagnosed with BPD? I've searched and searched for differences between these 2 disorders and I cannot find anything that distinguishes one from the other.
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Hope deferred makes the heart sick, but a longing fulfilled is a tree of life Proverbs 13:12

AustenJ
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« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2017, 07:46:26 AM »

I'm curious if there are parents who have received a diagnosis of
BPD of a child in early adulthood who have seen symptoms of the disorder much earlier in their child's life... .like they have an epiphany of, "well, that explains their strange behavior when they were 12!"

There just seems to be so much information on BPD, and so many family, friends, and lovers have shared personal stories of living with and growing up with someone with BPD, that there would be similar identifiers in younger children? And is there a way to help younger children cope? It's such a debilitating and destructive disorder... .
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« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2017, 08:54:32 AM »

that there would be similar identifiers in younger children?

You may want to watch the video.  Smiling (click to insert in post)
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