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THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY DISORDERS
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Author Topic: BPD BEHAVIORS: Dissociation and Dysphoria  (Read 68443 times)
TheRealJongoBong
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« Reply #50 on: September 03, 2015, 09:00:25 AM »

Here's my best example of dissociation. My uBPDw called the police on me and accused me of giving drugs to and having sex with the boys across the street. The police investigated and found the accusations groundless. By coincidence, at the time the police visited my mother was picking something up and witnessed the entire event. The very next day when I asked about what happened, she denied calling the police, said that they came to her after because the kid across the street was telling stories, that she didn't do anything. I got a copy of the police report just to check and it specifically stated that she was the one who initiated contact. This is also the story my mother told me. 

Now, she's either lying or she completely dissociated the whole event. My bet is on the latter. I was in no way confrontational when I asked her about it (I made an audio recording of the conversation), and I see no way how she thinks she could lie about it and get away with it considering the amount of evidence against her story. It's like she couldn't face her actions and completely blanked them. Very very curious.
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jTrue426
Formerly FFjay


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Keeping Promises


« Reply #51 on: November 28, 2015, 10:26:33 AM »

I definitely feel that I've witnessed symptoms of DID in my former SO. They are classic and common for DID and I haven't heard of them in BPD.
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hashtag_loyal
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« Reply #52 on: November 30, 2015, 10:32:10 AM »

I definitely feel that I've witnessed symptoms of DID in my former SO. They are classic and common for DID and I haven't heard of them in BPD.

There appears to be a high comorbidity between BPD and DID (something like 60-75%, I think.) However, I have not been able to find much information on the internet about what this means for the sufferers and those in their lives. I would very much like to learn more here, if possible.

My dBPDxgf has severe BPD, and I think she is also dx as DID as well, which is why I am particularly curious.
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jTrue426
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« Reply #53 on: December 10, 2015, 04:10:37 AM »

I definitely feel that I've witnessed symptoms of DID in my former SO. They are classic and common for DID and I haven't heard of them in BPD.

There appears to be a high comorbidity between BPD and DID (something like 60-75%, I think.) However, I have not been able to find much information on the internet about what this means for the sufferers and those in their lives. I would very much like to learn more here, if possible.

My dBPDxgf has severe BPD, and I think she is also dx as DID as well, which is why I am particularly curious.

What I experienced with my DBPDXGF was truly scary terrifying in I feel like I truly caught far more than a glimpse into madness that has affected me in a way I may never break free from or get past...
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Ylimepie

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« Reply #54 on: February 24, 2016, 04:46:25 PM »

I have pictures of my ex-husband (BP) when he is dissociating while standing next to me.  You can actually see on his face that he is just not mentally there.  I cannot imagine what the stressful part of the situation was since we were spending the 4th of July at an amusement park with my family. 

I also remember passing him in the hall of our home when I swear he did not realize I was there.

I do not have BPD, but I dissociate a lot.

Its kind of funny, because when I was taking psychology classes and read about dissocation, I never realized that I did it. It wasn't until I had my kids that I realize just how much I space out. There are a few books in our kids library that I have read several times, but I couldn't tell you the plot. I have watched entire movies that I haven't seen. Often, I will realize that my kids have been talking to me and I didn't realize it, and just last week, I walked by my son at his school, totally not realizing that he was there.

Its totally involuntary. I never realize that I am going into it. I only realize it when it is time to come out of it. It can frustrate my husband very much..sad

Its my comfort place. I want to go there.

I have noticed that I tend to go there when there is a lot of stimulation. An amusement park could certainly provide that.
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Fritz_27

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« Reply #55 on: July 22, 2016, 04:18:16 PM »

I disassociated for about a year.

It's weird. It's actually really pleasant in a way.

Imagine an emotional crisis as being like the turbulence of a raging sea, and disassociating as sinking into the quiet oblivion below. You just give up the struggle and let yourself go.

When you start trying to resurface, though, it's like getting the bends if you come up too fast. Because all that trauma is still there, it didn't go away. And now you have to deal with it all at once.



My partner described this feeling almost to the letter when we were talking after she was discharged from a hospitalization. But the way she talked about it.. It's as if she's addicted. And long story short, after a series of events and the effects of being on methylphenodate for a time, that feeling of peace has more or less conditioned her associate death with that feeling. Is there some kind of means to minimize the desire to return to that state? Like, any way to help her stop missing the dissociative feeling? Because she talks about it like an addict lamenting being in rehab (which is fair, when something feels good and it's the first time you've really felt peace in your life), but 'getting a fix' here implies a significant potential for repeat suicide attempts.
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