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Author Topic: FAQ: Is a personality disorder a mental illness or a character flaw?  (Read 6425 times)
C12P21
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« Reply #50 on: August 28, 2010, 09:36:38 AM »

Excerpt
It is a completely rational choice on their parts to not go to therapy, for the cost of exposure is far greater than the cost of just discarding  their loving and devoted abusee of the moment and just finding another hostage

Although I understand  your point..the use of the word rational is questionable. A person suffering from a disorder hasn't the ability of rationality. Is it rational to continue to sabatoge those around you..or yourself?
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C12P21 "and she lived happily ever after.."


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« Reply #51 on: August 29, 2010, 07:07:12 AM »

It's possible for perceptions to be distorted, so that the actions taking in response to those perceptions are, in a sense, "rational", given the distorted perceptions.
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« Reply #52 on: February 19, 2013, 12:36:56 PM »

This is not an illness like schizophrenia - neither extreme genetic sensitivity nor being invalidated as a child adds up to cognitive impairment in a medical sense.  It's a toxic brew, to be sure, but this is a psychological condition, not a brain impairment.  

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« Reply #53 on: February 19, 2013, 01:20:43 PM »

Tuli,

You might find these helpful:

www.nimh.nih.gov/science-news/2008/borderline-personality-disorder-brain-differences-related-to-disruptions-in-cooperation-in-relationships.shtml

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165032798001049

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006322301010757

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071221094757.htm

Any long-term emotional dysfunction creates changes in the brain.Also, according to Wikipedia, 25% of people with BPD don't have a history of abuse or neglect and because someone with a BPD parent is six times more likely to have BPD, it is thought to have a strong genetic link.  Of course there is the nature vs. nurture argument, but what about families with multiply siblings and only one develops BPD?  Again, very suggestive of genetics.

Unfortunately, even with all the tons of research out there indicating that BPD is a more severe, biologically rooted psychiatric d/o like schizophrenia, the powers that be let it stay a personality d/o in the upcoming DSM-V.

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« Reply #54 on: February 19, 2013, 01:58:08 PM »

This is not an illness like schizophrenia - neither extreme genetic sensitivity nor being invalidated as a child adds up to cognitive impairment in a medical sense.  It's a toxic brew, to be sure, but this is a psychological condition, not a brain impairment.   

Whatever you choose to call it, there is a great deal of impaired, distorted thinking involved. Emotional reasoning, black and white thinking, periods of dissociation (for some). Unrealistic idealization, unrealistic devaluation.

I think it is actually helpful to use some analogies to schizophrenia, because of how illustrative it is.

For example, it is just as pointless and inflammatory to try to argue someone with BPD out of their distorted thinking, as it is to try to argue someone with schizophrenia out of their hallucinations or delusions. It's just not as blatantly obvious how pointless it is, since the nature of the distortions is different.
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« Reply #55 on: February 19, 2013, 10:04:55 PM »


Thank you for these links.

I agree completely that genetic is an integral part of borderline and without it you don't have borderline.  A lot of the borderline condition cannot be fixed.  They can never live a normal life.  But the parts that can be changed relatively quickly with either behavior modification (like DBT) or neurolinguistic programming (PTSD work) would not be considered genetic.  Emotional dysregulation is genetic to some extent, but more as a predisposition to or a tendency or a weakness.

This is easy to prove anecdotally.  Many nons experience the borderline in highly dysregulated rage in the home, but when the phone rings or the doorbell rings, the borderline can transition instantaneously to calm and loving emotional states and transition back into the rage as soon as the door closes.  Also many recovering low-functioning borderlines in the recovery forums will admit to being able to plan their rage attacks or ride them consciously to their advantage.  

Much of what is reported firsthand from borderlines contradicts the present understanding by the medical community.  

This is very understandable as it as a very rapidly changing field, and really amazing progress is being made in what borderline is about at a very fast rate.  But I feel it is important for nons to remember that the borderline can heal the parts that hurt their partners the most.
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« Reply #56 on: February 20, 2013, 12:40:04 AM »

There's a quite a variety of research areas in respect to BPD.  There are several facets to the disorder including mood lability/affect and behavior in addition to cognitive functioning.  Cognitive functioning is one facet of the disorder where members see a marked difference in thinking patterns.  The other areas of mood/affect and behavior are not to be discounted as major contributing factors in the expression of the disorder.  Research in impaired cognitive functioning is fairly young and could vary by test sample size and other factors including severity of  the illness among participants

Some clinical info on cognitive impairments include the following:

The Psychiatric Clinics of North America2004 Mar;27(1):67-82, viii-ix.

Neuropsychological impairment in borderline personality disorder.

Monarch ES, Saykin AJ, Flashman LA.

Source

The Virtual Reality Treatment Center, 154 Waterman Street, Providence, RI 02906, USA. elenamonarch@yahoo.com

Abstract

In spite of accumulating evidence from neurological, neuroimaging, neuropsychological, and, more recently, developmental studies, borderline personality disorder (BPD) is not considered routinely a neurocognitive disorder. A review of the neuropsychological literature shows that the preponderance of BPD studies failed to examine a broad range of cognitive domains and, in particular, have not adequately evaluated attention. Nevertheless, most neuropsychological studies suggest that these patients' cognitive skills are compromised. The authors administered a neuropsychological battery designed to evaluate nine cognitive domains in twelve female inpatients diagnosed with BPD. Relative to a healthy normative group, inpatients with BPD were impaired in seven cognitive domains, with attention-vigilance and verbal learning and memory most pronounced. Neuropsychological performance was significantly related to degree of psychopathology. The authors recommend that clinicians routinely screen BPD patients for cognitive dysfunction and highlight the roles that this important knowledge can have in treatment.

PMID: 15062631 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Development and Psychopathology. 2005 Fall;17(4):1173-96.

Neurocognitive impairment as a moderator in the development of borderline personality disorder.

Judd PH.

Source

University of California, San Diego, Department of Psychiatry, Outpatient Psychiatric Services, 92103, USA. pjudd@ucsd.edu

Abstract

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by a pervasive instability of interpersonal relationships, affects, self-image, marked impulsivity, dissociation, and paranoia. The cognitive dimension of the disorder has received relatively little attention and is poorly understood. This paper proposes that neurocognitive impairment is a key moderator in the development of BPD and elaborates a possible pathway for the expression of the cognitive domain. Neurocognitive impairment is hypothesized to moderate the relationship between caretaking and insecure disorganized attachment and pathological dissociation in the formation of the disorder contributing to impaired metacognition and a range of cognitive difficulties. The empirical evidence from studies of cognitive processes, brain function, attachment, and dissociation that support this theory are reviewed and discussed. Areas for future research that might verify or refute this theory are suggested.

PMID: 16613436 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Quote from: idea.library.drexel.edu/bitstream/1860/2618/1/2006175355.pdf


Psychiatry Research. 2005 Dec 15;137(3):191-202. Epub 2005 Nov 17.

The neuropsychology of borderline personality disorder: a meta-analysis and review.

Ruocco AC.

Source: Department of Psychology, Drexel University, 245 N. 15th Street, Mail Stop 626, Philadelphia, PA 19102-1192, USA. acr32@drexel.edu

Abstract

The neuropsychological profile of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is unclear.  Past investigations have produced seemingly inconsistent results of precisely what neuropsychological deficits characterize the patient with BPD.  A meta-analysis of 10 studies was conducted comparing BPD and healthy comparison groups on select neuropsychological measures comprising six domains of functioning: attention, cognitive flexibility, learning and memory, planning, speeded processing, and visuospatial abilities.  BPD participants performed more poorly than controls across all neuropsychological domains, with mean effect sizes (Cohen’s d) ranging from -.29 for cognitive flexibility to -1.43 for planning.  The results suggest that persons with BPD perform more poorly than healthy comparison groups in multiple neurocognitive domains and that these deficits may be more strongly lateralized to the right hemisphere.  Although neuropsychological testing appears to be sensitive to the neurocognitive deficits of BPD, the clinical utility of these results is limited.  Implications of these findings for future neurocognitive investigations of BPD are discussed.



Development and Psychopathology 20 (2008), 341–368, Copyright 2008 Cambridge University Press

A neurocognitive model of borderline personality disorder: Effects of childhood sexual abuse and relationship to adult social attachment disturbance

MICHAEL J. MINZENBERG, JOHN H. POOLE, AND SOPHIA VINOGRADOV

University of California, Sacramento;

University of California, San Francisco; and

San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Abstract

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a paradigmatic disorder of adult attachment, with high rates of antecedent

childhood maltreatment. The neurocognitive correlates of both attachment disturbance and maltreatment are both

presently unknown in BPD. This study evaluated whether dimensional adult attachment disturbance in BPD is related to

specific neurocognitive deficits, and whether childhood maltreatment is related to these dysfunctions. An outpatient BPD

group (n ¼ 43) performed nearly 1 SD below a control group (n ¼ 26) on short-term recall, executive, and intelligence

functions. These deficits were not affected by emotionally charged stimuli. In the BPD group, impaired recall was related

to attachment–anxiety, whereas executive dysfunction was related to attachment–avoidance. Abuse history was correlated

significantly with executive dysfunction and at a trend level with impaired recall. Neurocognitive deficits and abuse

history exhibited both independent and interactive effects on adult attachment disturbance. These results suggest that

(a) BPD patients’ reactivity in attachment relationships is related to temporal–limbic dysfunction, irrespective of the

emotional content of stimuli, (b) BPD patients’ avoidance within attachment relationships may be a relational strategy to

compensate for the emotional consequences of frontal-executive dysregulation, and (c) childhood abuse may contribute to

these neurocognitive deficits but may also exert effects on adult attachment disturbance that is both independent and

interacting with neurocognitive dysfunction.

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« Reply #57 on: March 11, 2013, 05:31:14 PM »

Here is an article from January 2013:

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130115101427.htm

The most hopeful thing for me is the reference to the goal of all this research - to find better treatments for the ones we love that so struggle with BPD. Plus ways that I can develop my own knowledge to be in a more therapeutic relationship with my BPDDD26 hoping to trigger her ability to become more and more reflective and more open to doing therapy.

The hardest part for me is the economics of treatment - lots of money. lots of time (1-3 years investment in regularly participated in  treatment), and enough well-trained professionals and supervisors/support peers to meet the needs of this 1% - 2% of our population suffering with BPD.

It will take a community effort to see large scale change in all mental illness -- reduction of stigma and discriminatoin, shifting of funding for research and treatment, support for the caregivers willing to continue being invovled with their family and friends with BPD.

I have been struggling (big words, lots of distractions citing references, lots of information to absorb) to read a recently published book that focuses on the 'lack of sense of self' criteria in BPD as primary - the emotinal dysregulation as secondary - and all from a CNS point of view. (Central Nervous System). ":)issociation Model of BPD" by Russell Meares. He also offers a new protocal for therapy that focuses on  restoring 'self' in his book "BPD and the Conversation Model".  His work really parallels the skills that are working in my home to make things better (and my D26 refuses therapy - it is too unsafe yet for her, IMHO). These include Validation, values-based boundaries that take care of my and my home, Radical Acceptance, mindfulness...     By living these principles to the best of my ability I am seeing imporvements in all my relatiionships, even with my DD.

I am very passinate about the validity of the brain based research and look forward to changes in treatments. Now to find the resources to make them availavble to the broader population - patients, family/friend, community (neighborhood, schools,...   )

qcr  

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« Reply #58 on: April 27, 2013, 12:27:05 AM »

I used to think it was a controlled thing, but I am no longer clear on who is controlling the controls.  In our house the switches are harsh enough to have names (the kids and I named them) for the persona(s).  Mrs. Somewhere's voice, affect, stance, and even clothes change to match them.  She even has blanks about what she has said between them.

There is some excellent "wetware" brain research cited in this outstanding thread.  We (Mrs. Somewhere, that is) has an open offer for "free" (research) fMRI Brain Scans due to her eating disorder(s) and history of other related behaviors.

After the University figured out we have some knowledge of the topic, they have agreed to do wider area scans and adjust the protocols to catch more areas and behaviors.  Basically anything we ask for.  Mrs. Somewhere is none-too-happy about any of it.

I am reluctant to get involved due to boundary and family issues, but at this point I mostly want to help our 8 year old son, who has some early markers of BPD.  Great kid, kind, very (very, very) smart -- but has total dyregulation from time-to-time.  So I am looking at getting back into this field (EE, used to do Neural Implant studies), just to try to make help available for him, when and if the time comes.

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« Reply #59 on: April 27, 2013, 12:39:48 AM »

Here is an article from January 2013:

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130115101427.htm

The most hopeful thing for me is the reference to the goal of all this research - to find better treatments for the ones we love that so struggle with BPD. Plus ways that I can develop my own knowledge to be in a more therapeutic relationship with my BPDDD26 hoping to trigger her ability to become more and more reflective and more open to doing therapy.

The hardest part for me is the economics of treatment - lots of money. lots of time (1-3 years investment in regularly participated in  treatment), and enough well-trained professionals and supervisors/support peers to meet the needs of this 1% - 2% of our population suffering with BPD.

It will take a community effort to see large scale change in all mental illness -- reduction of stigma and discriminatoin, shifting of funding for research and treatment, support for the caregivers willing to continue being invovled with their family and friends with BPD.

I have been struggling (big words, lots of distractions citing references, lots of information to absorb) to read a recently published book that focuses on the 'lack of sense of self' criteria in BPD as primary - the emotinal dysregulation as secondary - and all from a CNS point of view. (Central Nervous System). ":)issociation Model of BPD" by Russell Meares. He also offers a new protocal for therapy that focuses on  restoring 'self' in his book "BPD and the Conversation Model".  His work really parallels the skills that are working in my home to make things better (and my D26 refuses therapy - it is too unsafe yet for her, IMHO). These include Validation, values-based boundaries that take care of my and my home, Radical Acceptance, mindfulness...       By living these principles to the best of my ability I am seeing imporvements in all my relatiionships, even with my DD.

I am very passinate about the validity of the brain based research and look forward to changes in treatments. Now to find the resources to make them availavble to the broader population - patients, family/friend, community (neighborhood, schools,...     )

qcr  

You are quite a Mom.  Super Job.

Agree on the wetware research and you seem to have a Very Good Understanding.  From some other end with Autism Study, I am almost expecting to see this become the other end of the same problem.  (Autism being hypo-connected, hypo-activity and BPD being hyper-connected, hyper-activity).

Unfortunately, you are also about a decade (or more) ahead of much of the would-be treatment community.  Or I guess I should say treatment industry.

There is a lot of stopped-learning-once-started practice folks who have absolutely no knowledge of these aspects of the topics, but continue to hack along on what they "learned" 20 or 30 years ago in school.
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« Reply #60 on: April 27, 2013, 12:54:34 PM »

You are quite a Mom.  Super Job.

Thanks - do not feel so successful the past couple weeks - lost contact with my mindfulness skills . Appreciate all the validation I get.
Excerpt
Agree on the wetware research and you seem to have a Very Good Understanding.  From some other end with Autism Study, I am almost expecting to see this become the other end of the same problem.  (Autism being hypo-connected, hypo-activity and BPD being hyper-connected, hyper-activity).

Unfortunately, you are also about a decade (or more) ahead of much of the would-be treatment community.  Or I guess I should say treatment industry.

There is a lot of stopped-learning-once-started practice folks who have absolutely no knowledge of these aspects of the topics, but continue to hack along on what they "learned" 20 or 30 years ago in school.

Maybe the changes have to come from a grass-roots community effort of caregivers that are now educating themselves, and you and I are. We have to be willing to become vulnerable and demand the services that our individual struggling loved ones need to find a fit into this community. The technology shift from agriculture and industrial has left so many outside the community they require to exist. So I sadly agree - it is probably going to take years - a decade - to see these efforts evolve.

The more we demand training and supervisory support of the professionals working with mental illness, the faster this will unfold. If we refuse to access and pay inadequately trained and supported therapists or clinics, their funding will dry up and they will disappear or change. This information is readily becoming accessible online, at conferences, at continuing education in the licensing process. I guess some political action on the licensing side would be helpful too.

Where do you all see this happening? How can we find our niche to help it along -- and have enough energy left to cope with our families? We need supervisory support too Doing the right thing (click to insert in post)

qcr
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GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

This board is intended for general questions about BPD and other personality disorders, trait definitions, and related therapies and diagnostics. Topics should be formatted as a question.

Please do not host topics related to the specific pwBPD in your life - those discussions should be hosted on an appropraite [L1] - [L4] board.

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« Reply #61 on: April 27, 2013, 12:58:46 PM »

I think I need to get more involved with NES-BPD in some way in my community. Not sure where to find what I can do, here is the website.

www.borderlinepersonalitydisorder.com/

Lots of info here to checkout.

qcr
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« Reply #62 on: April 28, 2013, 01:06:39 PM »

I am now best guessing that any practical solution(s) will come from outside the "helping" industries.

Stuff like this >>

www.darpa.mil/NewsEvents/Releases/2013/04/02.aspx
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« Reply #63 on: April 28, 2013, 09:07:01 PM »

Somewhere - the research data from all sources is important to meet many different needs. My peek at this web article is their research aims are very broad. It will take some focus from researchers in the interpersonal/psychological fields to apply the research to treatments for individuals.

My comments are most pointed toward encouraging those in the field for many years to stay current with new knowledge -- keep their treatment plans on best available paths.

Example: a professional making a blanket statement that all PD's come from childhood abuse or that it is all the parents fault.

qcr
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« Reply #64 on: May 09, 2013, 08:49:01 PM »

Looking at the criteria for BPD would help answer your question yes.

This may help The Symptoms and Diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder [NEW]

Understanding a person with BPD is disordered, with the emotional maturity of a 4 year old roughly. Imagine a 4 year old not comprehending  more mature situations and you can easily see how difficult this disorder could possibly be for them. Then you add in our misunderstandings of the disorder and not knowing how to communicate with a person with BPD and you have a recipe for a lot of hurt, on both sides.

For more in depth detail:

How a Borderline Personality Disorder Love Relationship Evolves
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« Reply #65 on: May 13, 2013, 08:14:03 PM »

In my very honest opinion, labels can be as useless as they can be useful.

It all boils down to, ":)ifferent people behave differently, 'clinically disordered' or not, and different people get along differently with different people."

Even if someone DOESN'T have the BPD tag, they can still be a 'BACON' and they can still keep showing that 'BACON' self and they can still keep displaying certain behavioral traits that are incompatible with you.

Voluntarily behaving in a disordered way or not, the fact remains that communication (and lifestyle, and whatever) wise, there is incompatibility.  Period.  And it is up to you to make a choice as to how to deal with it.

Without labels, if someone is displaying certain behaviors and keeps on lashing out inappropriately and with no self-awareness and a certain level of accountability (like, getting help or being open to getting help) and refuses to reach out towards self-awareness and a certain level of accountability (agreeing to do counseling), I will not tolerate it past a certain point.

Even if they got a 'clean bill of health' from a therapist that said, 'they do not have any PDs!' I still would not tolerate it past a certain point.

Why?

Because boundaries are boundaries and mutual respect is mutual respect and EITHER a consistent and aware breaking of either OR a consistent and un-aware breaking of either with no hope of awareness and healthy communication ARE deal-breakers.

They could be a 'BACON', they could be a 'HAM', they could be a 'BROCCOLI' or a 'BRUSSEL SPROUT'...   but if they are displaying certain behaviors that would otherwise be considered disordered if not for the labels of bacon, ham, or what-have-you...  

They simply ARE displaying certain behaviors.
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« Reply #66 on: May 14, 2013, 01:38:14 AM »

BPD is a longstanding and pervasive pattern of instability in thoughts, behavior and emotions that affects a persons interpersonal relationships and general ability to cope and function in a pro-social way.  The degree depends on the individual.

Here's a little bit on BPD: What is it? How can I tell?
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« Reply #67 on: May 19, 2013, 08:18:48 AM »

Alot of people can check of on BPD trait categories and not be considered personsality disordered. The two categories that most non personality disordered individuals would not would not be able to check off on are either IDENTITY DISTURBANCE (a feeling of not knowing who you are) OR INSTABILITY WITH SELF DIRECTION ( goals, career plans, and values). This is according to the DSM IV revised 2011. Not just any old jerk, or emotionally reactive person has an personality disorder. 

But, really in my opinion, I agree with the previous poster, there are other things that show clear indicators of a personality disorder which aren't even on the list! Those things being, remarkable projection, splitting (one day they love you, the next your evil) pulling and pushing, high sensitivity to rejection, intimacy fears, all very indicative of a BPD in my opinion. I also believe the lack of identity is a big one. I don't necessarily percieve an instability with self direction alone to be indicative of a personality disordered person as there are lots of people who have difficulty with self direction who are not personality disordered.
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« Reply #68 on: May 19, 2013, 03:56:42 PM »

Poor coping skills are not indicative to BPD alone.  Things like projection, splitting, etc aren't specific to people with BPD.  They can present on occasion in almost anyone.  Coping skills come in different forms appraisal focused, problem solving, or emotion focused. (Wikipedia has a pretty good synopsis of the them here www.en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coping_(psychology) ). When people talk about BPD behavior and the more defensive coping skills, it's when it's the standard life skill set not necessarily the exception.  So partners, parents, children see it repeatedly. 

People that struggle with BPD or traits its longstanding pattern of those criteria with deficits (a 2 or above impairment on the scale pretty consistently) in at least one of the self - self direction and identity - and at least one in interpersonal - empathy and intimacy - along with the other parts of the criteria like mood lability, hostility, etc.  And it's the severity of how these present.  The scale is 0 for healthy to 4 for severely impaired.   

It is combination of factors.   It can't just be lack of self direction alone, that doesn't make for a person meeting BPD criteria.  It's a difficult thing for professionals to diagnose, it takes time to see these things and rule out other things.

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« Reply #69 on: May 25, 2013, 10:50:36 AM »

Wouldn't it be great if we could get a 'picture' of the status at birth of each child's temperament and then tuck a little manual about best practices for providind a validating, loving environment for each one? With a page about their match to each caregiver/parents develpmental place? This would be magical thinking of course.

There is an abundance of information - how to get it to those least likely to have access, to those least likely to have acceptance of being told what to do.

It is a very complex developmental story for each of us. Those of us here are willing to do the work to improve ourselves and learn new ways to connect with difficult people. What are some ideas about how we can model this for others we touch with our lives?

qcr
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« Reply #70 on: May 25, 2013, 07:04:52 PM »

Who would Choose to act Crazy? BPD Is Not Choosen Its a horrible Mental Illness that People develop from Horrible Up bringings and being mis treated when they are younger...   I know its not a choice if it was then I don't think my DBPDH would continue to cry for help and try as hard as he does to be normal for once...  He hates that he deals with this every day...  It kills him inside. It SUCKS. And often people with BPD are just thrown on the back burner...  To difficult to treat many say...  Or made out to be monsters...  I honestly think they need a Solid support system behind them. Not people who back their thoughts up by basically running from them or saying they are horrible, When in my husbands case he has not one good thing to say about himself...  Why add to the negitive thoughts? Continue the positive I find it helps to reasure him that he does have some good about him and hes not useless and hopeless.

Just my opinion...  

My daughter had neither a horrible upbringing nor was she ever mistreated as a child, so I struggle even more to understand why she has this illness. 

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« Reply #71 on: May 26, 2013, 01:09:22 PM »

My daughter had neither a horrible upbringing nor was she ever mistreated as a child, so I struggle even more to understand why she has this illness.  

Science is still struggling to figure out the etiology. I believe the current theory is that it is a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental factors.

If so, that would likely mean that any number of possible percentages could occur ...  1%/99%, 40%/50%, who knows?

In his book about depression - another mental illness where they are trying to figure out the etiology - Perter Kramer talks about resilience. Someone with a high intrinsic (i.e. genetic) resilience can bounce back from X amount of stress. Someone with low resilience can't. So "is it the stress, or the genetics?" isn't a yes/no question.

Nobody has zero stress in their upbringing (or adult life). Everyone experiences some invalidation, disappointment, loss, separation, pain. It's unavoidable. How we react to it - how we even can react to it - is largely affected by our genetics.
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« Reply #72 on: May 27, 2013, 06:19:42 AM »

In his book about depression - another mental illness where they are trying to figure out the etiology - Perter Kramer talks about resilience. Someone with a high intrinsic (i.e. genetic) resilience can bounce back from X amount of stress. Someone with low resilience can't. So "is it the stress, or the genetics?" isn't a yes/no question.

Sorry, that's Peter Kramer - not "Perter" Kramer 
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« Reply #73 on: September 08, 2014, 09:03:13 PM »

It's a mental illness. 

//Mental Illness implies somewhat psychotic or non reality or simply paranoia type of mindset... too harsh a term?//

No, that's not what mental illness means.  That's the incorrect social stigma.  Depression is a mental illness.  You do NOT have to be psychotic ("crazy" to have a mental illness.
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« Reply #74 on: September 08, 2014, 09:05:26 PM »

My daughter had neither a horrible upbringing nor was she ever mistreated as a child, so I struggle even more to understand why she has this illness.  

I don't think BPD comes from life experiences.  I think it because of the brain not being "wired correctly".  Just as mood disorders are from the same thing or an imbalance of neurotransmitters. Now, your life experiences can certainly make things better or worse, but I don't think they are the underlying cause.
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