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Author Topic: BEHAVIORS: Anger and Rage and passive aggression  (Read 6631 times)
MindfulJavaJoe
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« Reply #25 on: August 02, 2011, 04:01:00 PM »

Randi Kreger is correct to point out that this is not a diagnostic criteria.

My uBPDw is skilled at getting her needs met.

She will turn on the charm (coy, diminutive, fluttering eyelashed) and if that does not work she quickly turns into full rage.

She might say 5 minutes later why do we have to fight why can't we just be friends. Suggesting that I am to blame.

She is emotionally labile switching from calm to full volcano mode in a blink of an eye sometimes triggered by trivial mannerisms or gestures. 
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« Reply #26 on: August 05, 2011, 08:05:55 AM »

Does passive agressive behaviour come under " 8. inappropriate, intense anger or difficulty controlling anger" in BPD diagnosis, or is it a stand alone entity?

Can anyone clarify for me plse
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whitedoe
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« Reply #27 on: August 06, 2011, 10:13:07 PM »

Great question! Mine also displayed what my therapist has called "rage" in the form of extremely "passive aggressive" behavior? I used to wonder about "rage" because I never really saw "rage" in this personality disordered man that I loved? But, perhaps the patterns of "passive aggression" are just another "flavor" of "rage"? I would love to hear what others know about this topic?

WhiteDoe
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Gettingthere
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« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2011, 04:25:59 PM »

Thanks for the input everyone.

From what i've read P.A is about unexpressed anger (or not directly expressed!) - see "living with the passive agressive man".  I think that's where i was getting confused - my husb VERY P.A but has other BPD traits without the full on verbal raging - but then my uBPD/NPDm was also pa with stony silences to boot 

Sp p.a behaviour can b a part of BPD in the context of rage?
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GirlfriendInHell

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« Reply #29 on: August 16, 2017, 01:15:38 PM »

My boyfriend, who I suspect has BPD but is yet to be diagnosed, experiences rage quite often and usually for irrational reasons. Just last week, he was trying to clean a pot to cook noodles but couldn't get something off of the bottom of the pot. He threw the pot in the sink, stomped to the bedroom, slammed the door and began punching the bed over and over. He then swung the door open, causing the door knob to penetrate the wall behind the door, yelled "I need to go for a walk" and stormed out of the house. I just sat there confused and frozen. Eventually he started texting me from wherever he was. After roughly half an hour to an hour, he came back in the house and muttered "sorry". He then went back into the room and laid down. That was the end of that but I was left sitting there scratching my head thinking "what just happened" and "did that really just happen over the pot?". I am slowly learning to expect these situations but in the moment I always feel like I'm frozen trying to catch up with the world around me.
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