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Before you can make things better, you have to stop making them worse... Have you considered that being critical, judgmental, or invalidating toward the other parent, no matter what she or he just did will only make matters worse? Someone has to be do something. This means finding the motivation to stop making things worse, learning how to interrupt your own negative responses, body language, facial expressions, voice tone, and learning how to inhibit your urges to do things that you later realize are contributing to the tensions.
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Author Topic: Do DV policies and enforcement empower BPD behavior?  (Read 6178 times)
Husband321
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« on: May 26, 2018, 08:34:35 AM »

This might be a touchy subject, but I think the worst part of dealing with BPD woman might be the law enforcement threat.

I think in a way police give this type of woman the ultimate trump card, and type of power that is what actually controls the nons life.

It seems women are a protected class, and a BPD woman can exploit this to her advantage.  

My ex wife would even tell me when raging "I know exactly how to act and what to say to get you arrested.  All I have to do is call".  And she is right.

I think unfortunately that's why it is best to run and cut ties with this type of woman immediately.  Maybe if laws were different, and the power balance more equal, they might change or it might be easier to deal with them without the fear of inprisonment for raising your voice or defending yourself.



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« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2018, 10:30:01 AM »

Interesting topic.  I'm sorry to hear that was your situation and can understand how frustrating and upsetting that must be. 

To balance the scales I was also threatened with the police on more than one occasion.  During a violent outburst when the police arrived to intervene, my ex began to make false accusations that he was prepared to report to them about my stealing from him.  This was projection of course, as he'd stolen from me but I didn't waste my time reporting it.  Also on the last occasion I visited him in his new place I was there with the intention to retrieve a laptop I'd lent to him and he threatened to call the police on me then.  I left the laptop and happily took the loss rather than deal with him any more.  So it seems it can work both ways.

The way I viewed it was a little bit like a child in the school playground having a gripe with another and threatening to 'tell their dad'.  Wielding a larger power I think made him feel he had some leverage over me in order to control my behaviour into doing what he wanted rather than honouring my own boundaries.  Nobody wants false allegations to be made against them, especially if it could result in having a record, and it seems this can be a last resort response from a sufferer of either sex if things aren't going their way. 

What have you taken from the experience that you will carry into the future with you?

Love and light x     
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« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2018, 10:58:13 AM »

Litigation is just the adult world form of bullying.

Yes she can use the cops to create a huge amount of wreckage in your life, it is not difficult at all to be arrested at the very least, be forced to defend your actions and the end result, best case scenario, is that you walk away unproven for the allegations. In the midst of that, legal fees, emotional turmoil and reputation damage. It is a tool that can be used with very little consequence or risk attached to the one making the allegations. Mines never did or hinted any of that, but I wouldnt put anything past her, and thanks for posting because its another thing to make me think twice about.
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Husband321
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« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2018, 11:10:50 AM »

Interesting topic.  I'm sorry to hear that was your situation and can understand how frustrating and upsetting that must be. 

To balance the scales I was also threatened with the police on more than one occasion.  During a violent outburst when the police arrived to intervene, my ex began to make false accusations that he was prepared to report to them about my stealing from him.  This was projection of course, as he'd stolen from me but I didn't waste my time reporting it.  Also on the last occasion I visited him in his new place I was there with the intention to retrieve a laptop I'd lent to him and he threatened to call the police on me then.  I left the laptop and happily took the loss rather than deal with him any more.  So it seems it can work both ways.

The way I viewed it was a little bit like a child in the school playground having a gripe with another and threatening to 'tell their dad'.  Wielding a larger power I think made him feel he had some leverage over me in order to control my behaviour into doing what he wanted rather than honouring my own boundaries.  Nobody wants false allegations to be made against them, especially if it could result in having a record, and it seems this can be a last resort response from a sufferer of either sex if things aren't going their way. 

What have you taken from the experience that you will carry into the future with you?

Love and light x     

I agree with your overall conclusion... It is a power play to retain control... .Have their own way etc.

And I am sure male BPD sufferers make the same threats.

However, at the end of the day, the system vastly is set up to protect poor beaten women, and at any hint of any sort of abuse, the man can have his life ruined immediately.  So it is nowhere the same level of power, fear, control etc, when a man threatens to calls the police on a gf. 

I think what it means in the real world is that the female BPD KNOWS she can be physically aggressive... She can damage things... She can basically act like a mad 4 yr old, and there is no real life recourse. On the flip side, SHE KNOWS she can make a call, say she was "pushed" and the husband or boyfriend is carted off to jail. Then the man is stuck in the legal system for years...

Men do not have this power within the system.  They are afraid to report abuse, as chances are THEY are the ones who will be arrested.

What have I learned?  To simply stay far away and not play with fire. I think in many relationships with a BPD woman this "power play" plays a large dynamic within the relationship.

Often times we all know BPD CAN control their rage and behavior. Knowing that legally they don't really have to , and that the tables can easily be flipped, does nothing more than to further encourage such behavior.



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« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2018, 08:11:31 PM »

Hi Husband321,

Excerpt
I think unfortunately that's why it is best to run and cut ties with this type of woman immediately.

I think that you’re right not everyone woman is going to treat you like this there is a small fraction of people that suffer from this disorder. I’m sorry that you had to go through that awful experience.
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« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2018, 10:47:01 PM »

Cut and run is a good option... .if you can identify the penchant for drama up front,  for both men and women.  There was police involvement and restraining orders in both relationships with my ex on either side of mine. And her husband was slammed to the ground and charged with resisting arrest two years ago  I was discussing this with a buddy of mine,  remembering the multiple police visits to his house when he was a teen because of his dad and step mom.  That kind of stuff isn't normal.   We both agreed.  

You're preaching to the choir here though.  How does realizing this help us move forward? Does it make us hypersensitive to even normal r/s "drama" going forward?
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« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2018, 11:02:34 PM »

No, a good Law enforcement officer will see through deceptions and lies, it usually comes as they keep dealing with the same lies...

my ex is  BPD- I was clued in after round 2 and 3 of silent treatment. Abuse... all fine in the shallows of Normal life... but I came to recognize the behaviors in other women, mainly... my career ended because a BPD gal was sleeping with my superior and his superior.  ( she was married to another) this woman was and still is abusing her husband, kids, and uses her threats to facilitate her needs... I was a threat... I caught her and her issues, which caused her to lose her kids... power of the BPD and narcissistic traits to get her whim done... I feel for the others, and her husband apologizes profusely for my loss of employment due to her lies, and her blackmail to my superiors.  Karma will come...

A good cop will see thru it... many good lawyers will not take a BPD client on as well... lies, failure to pay bills, etc... good luck
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« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2018, 11:22:39 PM »

Good cop vs. mandatory arrest protocols. One of the at risk youth I used to mentor was arrested for DV. He said that the female cop pounded her fist in frustration on her squad car as she was writing the report.  Shaking her head and pacing.  The cop intuited that she started it or engaged.  His likely BPD baby momma refused to press charges.  The DA disagreed and he spent 3 months in the county jail. 

After he got out he went back against my advice.  Now she's pulling the typical things,  blackmailing him for CS without an order.  Keeping their daughter away from him.  His past DV conviction puts him in a difficult place. 
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« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2018, 09:45:32 AM »


You're preaching to the choir here though.  How does realizing this help us move forward? Does it make us hypersensitive to even normal r/s "drama" going forward?

Well, I would like to make 2 points that I think might be valuable as I am 6 months removed from the relationship and can see things clearly.

A.  Often times we read BPD's are stuck around the 5 yo age mark emotionally... So its like dealing with a child at times.  Now how do people deal with children when they act up?  Even if raised correctly, children still will act up at times.

We might give them a time out. We might threaten to take away an activity they like... Some people, and it is perfectly legal, spank them. Or physically restrain them... Now during these times, as stressful as they might be, your 5 yo will not grab the phone, dial 911 and concoct a story to land you in jail.  We don't cower and run from a 5 yo when they act up. We don't let them destroy things or hit us. If we did, the 5 yr old might be trained that being aggressive actually works to get their way.

Now when dealing with a BPD woman who is raging, men are severely hindered as to what they can do. You cannot hit them back. Give them a time out. Restrain them. Etc. You sort of have to either leave, hope it blows over, etc. Which in a way MIGHT be sending the wrong message. Perhaps if you could stand up to them in all ways, this behavior would subside.  But in this day and age men cannot.

So 100% of the power is given to the BPD woman whom is acting like a child, raging, and being destructive.  Perhaps at times these women NEED someone to stand up to them, but its not possible. So in many ways we are limited as to our response.

Looking back my only fear was the police. I didn't care if she broke something. OR pushed me. Or even hit me as I was bigger and stronger.

B.  I also don't think many men who ignore the red flags realize how the system really works. Once in it you are basically guilty until proven innocent, embarrassed, can lose your freedom, job, family, income, right to own a gun, etc... All based solely on an allegation. So if your gf hints at calling police, or said she did before, it is a good clue to cut all ties and run.  You cannot stick around and try to help or be with a woman that has done this before, or threatens to in this current society.

In my case, my wife would get upset, pick up the phone, and just call 911 asking for a police escort. I mean we would barely be arguing at times and I would be shocked.  

Police come over, come inside, talk to us, she gathers her things and leaves... Then she would come back in  an hour and apologize... It was a scary and embarrassing ordeal to have 3 cop cars show up at my home in the neighborhood.

So after she did this a few times, and she said she never would again, she did it again... .

However this time when she called , I was recorded on the 911 tape as saying
"put the phone down", and I grabbed the phone...  Well, this is "obstructing a 911 call", and I was arrested for that. $3200 for bail, $1500 for an attorney, having to meet an "anger management" professional, and the whole ordeal took a year. (Luckily I had 3200 in cash at home or I could have been there for a while)

In the end  she wrote an email to the prosecutor admitting her illness, and it was all completely dropped. However this was solely up to the prosecutor.

I guess I am saying as we might try to learn all sorts of tools in communicating with a BPD, the most basic right of self defense and standing up to them is taken off the table because of the X factor which is law enforcement. Good cop or bad cop, they often times have to remove someone from the home, and most likely it will be the man. Even if you ate not falsely accused, and even if nothing got physical, once police are involved anything can happen.

And my BPD wife knew this so well... She would even tell me when upset... "Look, ill call the police and have you arrested. I am a woman and you are a man. What do you think will happen if I call to tell them you pushed me?"
 



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« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2018, 03:45:21 AM »

I only once had the police turn up and it was bizarre because it was one of those moments of her going into not even so much a rage but just a depressive temper tantrum over literally nothing. It was the circular depressive outlet moments where "I" (because I was the only one in the world to listen as a captive audience) cant even say what it was about because I had tuned out into my own world. I went to bed and all of a sudden there was a police officer there, I said "what are you doing here I never called you" and he was blunt and snappy saying "well, weve had a call she wants us here".

They ended up leaving the house with a "what the heck are we doing here" expression. Then her whole behavior towards me changed into wanting me to stay up and cook. It was almost as if she had obtained some sort of release, I had been painted black for some unknown reason and by disengaging and going to bed I had left her alone, so this was her last resort to force a response.

That was the only time it happened but maybe she did it as a way to show me that she could involve them if she felt she needed to. to answer your question, it all depends on what cops turn up and how much experience they have. They really dont care at all much of who is the real victim, if they turn up and you have punched a wall out of displaced anger, your just the equivalent of a piece of meat to them anyway, they dont care if you chose to live with someone that got you to that point.

Which is fair enough and they are just doing their jobs. In my scenario I wouldnt have had the police to worry about, my ex knew lots of shady violent and disordered people. being arrested and jailed for a few months would have been the least of my concerns. She wouldnt have phoned the police for a slap, which she was literally begging for at times, but it would have just validated to her that I was the bad person who was responsible for all her current and future feelings of emptiness and unhappiness.

I think in that situation they probably realised she was "nuts" and there wasnt any evidence of any crime. It was surreal though and I think I was more taken back by how bizarre it all was that it didnt even register to me what was actually going. I still havent worked out who was more insane, her or me for staying through it.
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« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2018, 03:29:23 PM »


I think in that situation they probably realised she was "nuts" and there wasnt any evidence of any crime. It was surreal though and I think I was more taken back by how bizarre it all was that it didnt even register to me what was actually going. I still havent worked out who was more insane, her or me for staying through it.

I hear you.

When mine would call the police for a "police escort", it was as if she got a sort of high out of it. Her demeanor changed, she would walk about calm and smug, gathering her things, ignoring me, while being friendly with the police... All to return within an hour like nothing happened,

Also, looking back, I am wondering how on earth did I stay? Why did I? it was downright scary to live with someone who loves you one minute, but could jeopardize your future the next over any disagreement
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« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2018, 07:42:42 AM »

Hi,

I'm female and I've also been threatened with police like others here. It is a control tactic and men can use it too. I called his bluff on it. But let me assure you it is scary, in my case, to be in a foreign country and have someone acting like they are willing to do anything to destroy you and your life.

Women's shelters exist for a reason. The women's movements around the world struggled and created them to help people who are especially vulnerable to abuse. Men, by and large, don't face the same challenges, but that is not to say at all that it isn't hard to be a man. It is. Men can be terrorized by women with false accusations just like women can be. I see no point in pitting men and women against each other. If there was a movement for men that paralleled the feminist movement in size and scope and was up to challenging patriarchy, male privilege, expectations of men, and was open to a reframing of masculinity that was more positive I'd be all for it.

Man, the things I forget that have happened sometimes! A little here, a little there, it all adds up!

Your best chance with the police is to be articulate and calm. Short of that, and even then, anything can happen.

wishing you peace, pearl.
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« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2018, 10:16:50 AM »

Hi,

I'm female and I've also been threatened with police like others here. It is a control tactic and men can use it too. I called his bluff on it. But let me assure you it is scary, in my case, to be in a foreign country and have someone acting like they are willing to do anything to destroy you and your life.

Women's shelters exist for a reason. The women's movements around the world struggled and created them to help people who are especially vulnerable to abuse. Men, by and large, don't face the same challenges, but that is not to say at all that it isn't hard to be a man. It is. Men can be terrorized by women with false accusations just like women can be. I see no point in pitting men and women against each other. If there was a movement for men that paralleled the feminist movement in size and scope and was up to challenging patriarchy, male privilege, expectations of men, and was open to a reframing of masculinity that was more positive I'd be all for it.

Man, the things I forget that have happened sometimes! A little here, a little there, it all adds up!

Your best chance with the police is to be articulate and calm. Short of that, and even then, anything can happen.

wishing you peace, pearl.


I guess we have to agree to disagree.

If your ex called police on you and you were hauled off to jail for doing nothing that is very unfortunate.   If he said you raped him, or beat him and the police took you to jail I am very sorry.  I feel that is however pretty rare.  :)id you go to jail? Did he even call?

It's like when people say pithulls are dangerous because they bite people. And someone stands up and says "it's not true!  My uncle goes around biting pitbulls!"

You can read these stories on many sites.   And I think we all generally know if police come to a domestic dispute it is by and large always going to be the man  taken to jail.  That is what BPD women know, and that is what male nons know. Just the way it is.

As men we can't really involve the police with a BPD woman. So that option is off the table. That is an option women have and one that BPD women exploit to the fullest.

Example.  Let's say my BPD wife is swinging at me and throwing things. I call the police. I tell them what happened.  She tells them I was throwing things and swinging at her. "Sir.  Hands behind your back.  We have to take someone to jail"
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« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2018, 10:37:42 AM »

Pearle   This is the difference.

If the male BPD is raging and hitting you, you can just call the cops on him. He is taken to jail.

Most likely he won't be doing the hitting AND calling cops.

With the female BPD they can hit you AND call the cops. Which leaves the male what option?
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« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2018, 01:39:38 PM »

I guess my overall point is that if you meet a woman who was repeatedly in relationships with "abusers", and she mentioned in passing calling the police on them, you need to wake up and realize you will be you next.  And most likely this woman is BPD.   Instead of falling for her "victim" stories, which is also what I did.

Over the years I came to find out my ex wife called the police on her first bf 3 times. Second bf twice.  First husband 7 times, and then me several times.  Every man was arrested at some point in time. Those are just the men I know of that she told me about calling the police on. 

Now how many times do you think my wife was arrested? ZERO.  And I can tell you she has an evil and vicious temper she can't control. 

Every man she came across landed in jail.

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« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2018, 03:05:37 PM »

Over the years I came to find out my ex wife called the police on her first bf 3 times. Second bf twice.  First husband 7 times, and then me several times. 

What's interesting is that you did stay long enough for it to happen several times.  Perhaps you found out about the history after that had happened, so I won't assume that you recognised the pattern at the time.  How long before the last time she called the police on you was the first occasion and are you able to put your finger on what it was that compelled you to remain in the r/s in between?

Love and light x
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« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2018, 05:22:05 PM »

What's interesting is that you did stay long enough for it to happen several times.  Perhaps you found out about the history after that had happened, so I won't assume that you recognised the pattern at the time.  How long before the last time she called the police on you was the first occasion and are you able to put your finger on what it was that compelled you to remain in the r/s in between?

Love and light x

I was naive... I was thinking as long as I did nothing, how on earth could I get into trouble?  I also believed her when she said she "never would again", and that she would get help if I forgave her...  
At the time I wasn't ready to divorce over that which would have meant a big upheaval in living situations, my son, her kids etc.

Now once I did get into trouble, the dynamic totally changed even more. She had 100% of the power... I was the husband out on bail... If she smacked me could I smack her back?(not that I ever did) Nope... Would I dare risk jail by calling the police on her for destroying things? Nope... The best I could do is leave the premises if she started up, which most likely made her lose even more respect for me for not standing up to her.  It would be like giving a 5 yr old total control over your life.

I do think BPD's largely CAN control their behavior...  If they make a call over nonsense THEY should go to jail... If they hit you they should be hit back... .If they cheat during a divorce THEY should lose everything... .I can almost guarantee many of their "bad behaviors" would subside quickly...

But as it is now, a BPD woman can cheat and it has no bearing in divorce. They can hit you and KNOW you won't call the cops. And they know THEY can call the cops and have you hauled away...

So the legal system totally enables BPD women to act like crazy 5 yr old children with all the power.  

And as for DV laws going with ways, I didn't hear too many DV groups coming to Tiger Woods support when his wife smacked him in the head with a golf club through the car window for cheating. Or knocking the rest of his windows out while he was driving away.

It was more or less a tonight show punchline or joke.  If the tables were reversed, any man would be imprisoned for that... For decades.  He would be a monster who used a deadly weapon against his wife. But we largely viewed is wife as the poor woman who was cheated on by some jerk who deserved it.

So we live in a "feminized society", and men need to be ultra careful when dealing with a BPD woman.





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« Reply #17 on: May 31, 2018, 06:08:39 PM »

Did she get the help she promised to get?

There are local domestic abuse services and national groups who take male partner domestic violence victims very seriously.  There is support for men who are going through this.  I'd be a bit wary of major reform to DV policy when only 150 years ago it was legal and therefore perfectly acceptable for a man to beat his wife (certainly in the UK).  It's taken a long time and a huge amount of campaigning to get to where we are now.  In Britain, a woman is assaulted in her home every 60 seconds and one woman a week is murdered by her partner or ex partner.  On average a woman is assaulted 15 times before she calls the police.  (I happen to know these figures because of a domestic violence recovery programme I attended) It's important that those calls are taken seriously.

I hear your feelings that it's unjust that some individuals are taking advantage of that system and I understand how distressing and frustrating that must be.  What would you change about the system if you were able?  What could you change if you were ever in the same situation again?  What would you change if you could go back and have a do over? 

Love and light x   
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« Reply #18 on: May 31, 2018, 06:10:56 PM »


I do think BPD's largely CAN control their behavior...  If they make a call over nonsense THEY should go to jail... If they hit you they should be hit back... .If they cheat during a divorce THEY should lose everything... .I can almost guarantee many of their "bad behaviors" would subside quickly...
Totally agree. My STBX controlled his behavior when it suited him.
But as it is now, a BPD woman can cheat and it has no bearing in divorce.
Do you mean cheat sexually? In my state, cheating has no bearing in a divorce, and, believe me, I wanted (still want) to go after my STBX for cheating. It's a No Fault state. Makes no difference legally for either the husband or wife.

So the legal system totally enables BPD women to act like crazy 5 yr old children with all the power.  
Funny the similarity here. I always said that my STBX acted like he was five, and he was enabled to behave that way by his psychiatrist and his FOO. He was/is wealthy, and as you point to the legal system, I pointed to his wealth enabling him to get out of anything he did, including attempting to rob a bank.


So we live in a "feminized society", and men need to be ultra careful when dealing with a BPD woman.
I'd broaden this: Both men and women need to be ultra careful when dealing with someone with BPD. I had a friend who was attempting to divorce his BPD wife, and she plotted his murder. Got caught. But still pretty creepy to know someone's trying to kill you.
Right before my STBX left, I was terrified that he had hired someone to kill me. There were cars and trucks going by the house very slowly early in the morning. Freaked me out.
I need to remember just how terrifying that was.
So, yeah, I agree: be very very careful with people with BPD (or NPD). They are not particularly nice people.
TMD






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« Reply #19 on: May 31, 2018, 06:21:44 PM »

Did she get the help she promised to get?

There are local domestic abuse services and national groups who take male partner domestic violence victims very seriously.  There is support for men who are going through this.  I'd be a bit wary of major reform to DV policy when only 150 years ago it was legal and therefore perfectly acceptable for a man to beat his wife (certainly in the UK).  It's taken a long time and a huge amount of campaigning to get to where we are now.  In Britain, a woman is assaulted in her home every 60 seconds and one woman a week is murdered by her partner or ex partner.  On average a woman is assaulted 15 times before she calls the police.  (I happen to know these figures because of a domestic violence recovery programme I attended) It's important that those calls are taken seriously.

I hear your feelings that it's unjust that some individuals are taking advantage of that system and I understand how distressing and frustrating that must be.  What would you change about the system if you were able?  What could you change if you were ever in the same situation again?  What would you change if you could go back and have a do over?  

Love and light x    

I do not put much faith in stats unless I know exactly how they are compiled.  It is really eye opening to see how most of them are. I also read a new study that illustrates men are far more often the victims of DV, but never report it.

I do find it interesting in the USA it is legal to hit children. Children are totally captive and cannot leave.  But I guess they do not vote, so whooping them is acceptable.

I also don't know about a "huge amount of campaigning" as govts typically grow their power on their own.  And if some politicians get more votes for doing so, all the better for them.

What would I change?  I don't think law enforcement should even be involved in DV disputes.  In many nations they are not. If they are, false reports need to be severely punished.  It's quite scary to be hauled away because "someone feels scared". Which is where we are at now.

And I feel if any man starts dating a woman and they speak of how they called the cops on an ex, it is a good clue to run. Either they choose horribly, or they are full of drama




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« Reply #20 on: May 31, 2018, 06:34:22 PM »

Did she get the help she promised to get?

There are local domestic abuse services and national groups who take male partner domestic violence victims very seriously.  There is support for men who are going through this.    

Are these  just words that sound good? So their are services and groups who "take it seriously". Along with "national support for men?" What does that mean in practical terms?

So let me ask.  What should a man do if how BPD wife is hitting him?  Obviously it isn't life threatening YET, but what should he do?

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« Reply #21 on: May 31, 2018, 06:58:24 PM »

Did she get the help she promised to get?

There are local domestic abuse services and national groups who take male partner domestic violence victims very seriously.  There is support for men who are going through this.  I'd be a bit wary of major reform to DV policy when only 150 years ago it was legal and therefore perfectly acceptable for a man to beat his wife (certainly in the UK).  It's taken a long time and a huge amount of campaigning to get to where we are now.  In Britain, a woman is assaulted in her home every 60 seconds and one woman a week is murdered by her partner or ex partner.  On average a woman is assaulted 15 times before she calls the police.  (I happen to know these figures because of a domestic violence recovery pr

Love and light x   

You do realize i could substitute "child" in the above, and change the words from assault to "spank" or "corporal punishment and that is perfectly acceptable.  And statistically far more women assault their children than men.  (Most likely because they are around them far more).  Which perhaps might be a causal link to all the violent men walking around who were assaulted  by their moms.

And it is interesting that I am repeatedly asked "why did you stay?"  Where as I don't think women are asked that.  And if they were it would not be PC. 
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« Reply #22 on: May 31, 2018, 07:21:40 PM »

Not sure if I can post links here.  But just illustrating how it is a fact most DV is women against men.  While women account for 7 percent of arrests.

https://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/crime/item/19133-women-more-likely-to-commit-domestic-violence-studies-show
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« Reply #23 on: May 31, 2018, 08:13:20 PM »

So their are services and groups who "take it seriously". Along with "national support for men?" What does that mean in practical terms?

This comes from the National Hotline website:

Excerpt
According to the CDC, one in seven men age 18+ in the U.S. has been the victim of severe physical violence by an intimate partner in his lifetime. One in 10 men has experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner. In 2013, 13% of documented contacts to the Hotline identified themselves as male victims. Although they make up a smaller percentage of callers to the Hotline, there are likely many more men who do not report or seek help for their abuse, for a variety of reasons:

You can find the rest of the page 'Men can be victims of abuse too' on their site HERE to read more.  The site has a good section titled Path to safety, which covers all the key things my domestic abuse advocate went through with me regards safety planning and planning ahead if leaving the r/s.  

What should a man do if how BPD wife is hitting him?  Obviously it isn't life threatening YET, but what should he do?


If a man's wife is abusing him physically, whether BPD or not, I'd advise him to seek help.  Violence can escalate over time and it's important to ensure the safety of a partner who is being abused, and that of any children in the home.  I've also been in the situation where I didn't know what to do.  Violence can be a final assertion of power and control after a lengthy psychological wearing down which can leave a partner feeling exhausted, emotionally worn out, isolated and helpless.  There's also the shame factor amongst other reasons that a partner may stay in an abusive r/s.  :)oes any of that resonate?  Talking about this is uncomfortable and can bring up a lot of emotions.  It is understandable that this would be upsetting for you and I want to assure you that we are here for you as you work through whatever comes up.  

This being the Learning board, we come here to ask the difficult questions of ourselves and if it becomes triggering for you to think about something, then it's advisable to step away from your computer for a while and give yourself a break.  It can be hard to look back on difficult memories and start to look deeper into the whys and wherefores.  We get that.  There's no pressure to reply right away.  Take all the time you need.  It's your journey.  Many of us can empathise with that.  

Love and light x

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« Reply #24 on: June 01, 2018, 09:10:21 AM »


The Department of Justice reports that 75% of the DV deaths are female, 25% are male. Most of the research I've read suggest that percentages are almost flipped for low level assault (slapping, kicking, etc.).
 
I wanted to share this subdata about men killed in DV in Maryland in 2009 (example of the numbers behind the numbers):
 
48%
19%
24%
10%
Killed themselves or were killed after committing murder
Killed by a boyfriend/husband
Killed by a women
Were children
www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/sexist/2010/02/01/why-do-so-many-men-die-as-a-result-of-domestic-violence/
 
If the Maryland number are typical for other states, this would suggest that 8-9% of the dv deaths are caused by women.
 
No point here other than trying to give a balanced profile of the state of serious domestic abuse (the data that is driving the lawmakers).
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« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2018, 09:42:45 AM »


The Department of Justice reports that 75% of the DV deaths are female, 25% are male. Most of the research I've read suggest that percentages are almost flipped for low level assault (slapping, kicking, etc.).
 
I wanted to share this subdata about men killed in DV in Maryland in 2009 (example of the numbers behind the numbers):
 
48%
19%
24%
10%
Killed themselves or were killed after committing murder
Killed by a boyfriend/husband
Killed by a women
Were children
www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/sexist/2010/02/01/why-do-so-many-men-die-as-a-result-of-domestic-violence/
 
If the Maryland number are typical for other states, this would suggest that 8-9% of the dv deaths are caused by women.
 
No point here other than trying to give a balanced profile of the state of serious domestic abuse (the data that is driving the lawmakers).


I think why certain law makers introduce or pass certain laws is definitely up for debate.  I suppose no matter how many different laws we have against murder, people will still murder.  How many murders are prevented by these new laws? I have no idea.  How many more are actually caused by these new laws? No idea.

We live in a new age in many ways.  As you stated, low level DV is usually initiated by women in this day and age.  They are no longer the stereotypical gentle ladies we envision 100 years ago. Why are they initiating violence against others who are much bigger and stronger in most cases?  Well because they can. 

But boys are still trained to "be a man". "Not strike a woman" etc.

So while these new laws help ruin the lives of many men who are not murderers or even assaulters, women, and especially BPD women, initiate violence more and more. 

I have a long time friend from college who is not BPD.  She told me "you know. I was always acting up. Being a brat.  And one day my husband slapped me. From that day on I totally respected him as the man. "

Does this mean going around hitting women is a good idea.  Lol.  Of course not.

But if a BPD woman is raging on you, perhaps that is what she needs. 

Those options are taken off the table because men with guns who have no idea of what is going on will haul you away.   And I feel that sends a powerful message to BPD women. "See I was right.  I am a woman.  I can rage.  Act like a 5 yr old, hit you, and YOU are still wrong". Which makes standing up to them and having a balanced relationship a very difficult thing to do.



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« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2018, 09:55:50 AM »

As an example, they do studies all the time.

When people walk by a man hitting a woman, people call the police. Intervene.

When people walk by a woman hitting a man, they chuckle.  Laugh. It is more or less "oh wow. Wonder what he did to make her mad. Hahaha"

So while we have new laws, I don't think they were made with BPD women in mind. Which is what we are talking about. 

Imagine the insanity if your 5 yr old was able to threaten to call the police if you don't let him stay up late.  Or if you stopped him from hitting you.  And if you know, and your 5 yr old knows you are afraid of this happening. 

All of his bad behaviors would sort of be validated and you would be living at his mercy.   That's kind of what it feels like with a BPD woman.  They are emotionally about 5, know they can get away with things, and if need be can call the police to have more people on their side.  None of that influences a BPD to change. 





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« Reply #27 on: June 01, 2018, 10:41:17 AM »

There are zero men’s shelters in my area.
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« Reply #28 on: June 01, 2018, 03:23:22 PM »

I think why certain law makers introduce or pass certain laws is definitely up for debate.

Legislators and enforcers (police), even the NFL, are largely driven the public outcry that occurs when a women is killed by her husband and there are prior police reports of DV.

There are many men and men's rights groups that counter with how problematic these laws and policies are for men who end up being arrested and spend thousands in legal fees to resolve false DV reports.

There are studies that show extremely high rate of false DV reports during divorces with custody disputes. The legal professionals and the courts know this, but it continues.

Society supports this over-reach in protecting women from domestic homicide and politicians prefer this over reach rather than take political hits. A judge friend once explained to me, I rather save a women's life than protect a handful of hot head guys from a night in jail and a few thousand in legal fees.

Personally, I wish we could do both. Protect women and be fair to men, but this problem exists.

I have a long time friend from college who is not BPD.  She told me "you know. I was always acting up. Being a brat.  And one day my husband slapped me. From that day on I totally respected him as the man. "

Does this mean going around hitting women is a good idea.  Lol.  Of course not.

But if a BPD woman is raging on you, perhaps that is what she needs.

I have a powerful dog. The prior owner couldn't control the dog, hit it a lot, and finally surrendered her.  She has been with me for 3 years. I never hit her, never raised my voice. She is good with babies, small dogs, cats. I take her shopping and to restaurants. She respects me and is confident (not fearful). I respect her and I am confident and not fearful.

Is hitting a way to respect with animals or people? I haven't ever used it.

What do you think? Sounds like you support a little intimidation from time to time.

Good question. I will be interested to hear what others say.
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« Reply #29 on: June 01, 2018, 04:40:12 PM »

I think in the dog example, if you adopted this dog and it did attack you and latch on, or attacked someone else, hitting it or kicking it to make it stop would definitely be justified.  It would probably be your natural reaction.

I support self defense.  Not intimidation.  In my above example with the woman getting slapped by her husband, he finally had enough of her raging. Immaturity.  And "low level" domestic violence.  If he cowered and ran to tell family members I wonder if she would have respected him more then? Or less?

Before this got sidetracked into a male/ female argument, what most interested me was an overall hypothesis or 2.  

A I feel BPD's can control themselves.  Mine wasn't attacking police, strangers, or other men or women.  If a BPD woman continuously rages and assaults her partners,  if one person ever hit her back, would she have adapted her behavior? If she did not have the police at her disposal, would she change her ways?  

B. Deep down, does a BPD woman WANT a man to stand up to her? Or does she respect you more if you leave, call support groups, tell family
Members etc.

Looking back I think it is difficult to gain a BPD females respect if you run away from them.  And if they know they can hit you. And if they know you are scared of them calling the police.

But in this current day and age, merely defending yourself against a woman is not an option.  Below is tips from webmd if you are a male suffering DV.

Imagine a school bully that had anonymity from any retribution and even had the school staff and law enforcement on his side!  :)o you think he would bully more? Or less?

"Never allow yourself to be provoked into any kind of retaliation," says Brown. "We tell men if they have to be in an argument, do it in a room with two doors so they can leave; a lot of times a woman will block the door, the man will try to move her, and that will be enough for him to get arrested."
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