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THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY DISORDERS
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Author Topic: Can BPD be cured or go into remission?  (Read 57106 times)
snwelsh

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« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2009, 04:13:45 PM »

Do BPD people ever get better?

Is this something they can just wake up from and begin behaving humanely?  With or without treatment?

Or does medication just make them slightly more tolerable without getting rid of the abhorent behaviors?

Will they always be untrustworthy, chaos causing people?
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JoannaK
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« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2009, 04:35:21 PM »

Many people with BPD can recover.  There are some studies that show that as many as 80+% can recover to the point that they are not longer diagnosable with BPD traits.  The key is that the person with BPD needs to be very committed to recovery.  We have had some people here who are experiencing great joy with their recovered/recovering BPD partners.

They can't just wake up and begin behaving humanely.. it takes commitment, treatment, and often medications in the early stages of recovery.

Medication can help with some of the symptoms of BPD, but it isn't a cureall.  Appropriate therapy, usually Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, is the gold standard in treatment.

"Untrustworthiness" is not a diagnostic trait of BPD, but many here have reported untrustworthy BPD loved ones.  Sometimes tbe person may be more antisocial p.d. instead of BPD...  It's often hard to tell the difference as some of the patterns of behavior can cross.
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Christy2
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« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2009, 06:16:36 PM »

The statement you will hear echoed over and over when you ask this question is yes, they can, but THEY must be committed to it

As Joanna said:

Quote
The key is that the person with BPD needs to be very committed to recovery.

Note - "the person with BPD" - not the spouse of the BPD, the parent of the BPD or the child of the BPD.  We can be committed to assisting them through recovery, but they must recognize they have a problem and do something about it.

And sometimes, they can SEEM recovered, but when a big stressor in life hits they fall off the wagon (which is what my story has been lately with my uBPDh.)  Of course - I guess I expected that to happen someday when I told him about the success of Dialectical Behavior Therapy but that it was pretty intense and he laughed and said "yeah right - like I'm going to do something really intense."  Hmmm - note the lack of committment there?

This is one reason why you will find alot of emphasis put on working on ourselves here on the board.  Ultimately, that is something we have so much more control over.
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snwelsh

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« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2009, 09:58:10 PM »

So this would explain why 6 years of Zoloft didn't "cure" my mother, but made her tolerable?  And why when she discontinued her Zoloft she became just as bad - if not worse - than before...because she never addressed the problem, just medicated the symptoms?

But none of that means she can't get better one day - just that it will be a long, hard journey to change 68 years of behavior?  And only then if she ever decides to?
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Girl Friday

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« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2009, 05:39:23 PM »

As a BPD suffer I can say this,

BPD is something you are. You can medicate some symptoms (my meds have saved me and made me able to deal with therapy) Dialectic Behavioral therapy teaches you vital skills to living with this disorder!

These together can offer you a way to manage BPD and live a normal life but it never leaves. It's something you have to accept and learn to live with.
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arjay
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« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2009, 06:01:50 PM »

Note - "the person with BPD" - not the spouse of the BPD, the parent of the BPD or the child of the BPD.  We can be committed to assisting them through recovery, but they must recognize they have a problem and do something about it.

I've read that a supportive family is a very significant factor in helping someone in getting BPD under control.
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Christy2
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« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2009, 04:52:05 AM »

...Girl Friday , thank you for the insight...

and thank you for the guts, commitment and effort you made in going through DBT.  That says many positive things about your character. 

So this would explain why 6 years of Zoloft didn't "cure" my mother, but made her tolerable?  And why when she discontinued her Zoloft she became just as bad - if not worse - than before...because she never addressed the problem, just medicated the symptoms?

But none of that means she can't get better one day - just that it will be a long, hard journey to change 68 years of behavior?  And only then if she ever decides to?

Yes, that is pretty much it.  My husband is on meds and they do help keep things tolerable, but he has never gotten "well" because he doesn't care to do the work involved in that.  In his mind, tolerable is good enough.  I've compared it to someone with a serious injury who considers themself okay once the Emergency Room gets them stabilized so they leave the hospital, when in reality they are far from being healthy.  But getting healthy takes alot more work than just taking a pill.  Work that at this point in time anyway, my husband is not willing to do. 
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« Reply #17 on: April 26, 2009, 06:11:17 PM »

Substantial research now sheds light on many of these mythical assumptions. There is strong evidence from the McLean Study of Adult Development that 40% of patients with borderline personality disorder remit after 2 years, with 88% no longer meeting Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines—Revised or DSM-III-R criteria after 10 years (2). The temporal stability (or lack of it) in a borderline personality disorder diagnosis has also been examined in the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study, and findings suggest that about one-half of those who meet borderline personality disorder on intake no longer meet DSM-IV criteria 24 months later (3

My reading of "no longer meeting Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines - Revised or DSM III-R criteria" simply means that these individuals meet LESS than the five out of nine requirement.  To infer that it means that they have been "cured" would be completely unwarranted.
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Steph
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« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2009, 02:16:12 PM »

I have a 100% success story.   My husband was diagnosed BPD several times...rages, suicide attempts, road rage, verbally and emotionally controlling and abusive, dissociative, emotionally VERY labile, impulsive..you name it.

He eventually got into  DBT and stayed for 3.5 yrs. I went into codependancy therapy and DBT for family members.

He has been 100% symptom free now since last August. Period. He is able to identify his emotions, regulate them, he is not at the mercy of them..he functions on a normal and healthy level. Our relationship is VERY happy and healthy. He graduated from "advanced DBT" and his DBT therapist pronounced him well. Our DBT skilled marital therapist pronounced us well.

He did change a bit..he is not impulsive, he is better organized, he is thoughtful and very insightful into himself. He can talk about the hard stuff of the past, he doesnt melt down, implode, explode..In short, all is very, very well.

Steph
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arjay
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« Reply #19 on: May 06, 2009, 02:28:03 PM »

My reading of "no longer meeting Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines - Revised or DSM III-R criteria" simply means that these individuals meet LESS than the five out of nine requirement.  To infer that it means that they have been "cured" would be completely unwarranted.

So does this mean that anyone that has ANY traits of BPD are mentally ill?

These mental disorders are comprised of common human traits taken to the extreme.   Unstable relationships?  Half of all people that marry get divorced. I'm divorced.  Impulsiveness is seen in many people. My mother is impulsive.  We all feel some level of abandonment. You, yourself, struggle with this one.

People with BPD coming out of treatment are no longer suicidal, cutting, unemployable. These are success stories and the first steps in reclaiming their lives.
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