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THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY DISORDERS
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Author Topic: Age: Do the symptoms of BPD improve/worsen with age?  (Read 61426 times)
Randi Kreger
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« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2010, 12:02:41 PM »

As concerns (most probably) low functionning BP, there is a recent paper by Zanarini et al. A 10-year follow up of 362 BP initially contacted while they were in-patients. While impulsivity and severe difficulties in interpersonal management showed a reduction in some individuals, chronic disyphoria, abandonment and dependency issues tended to remain over time. Here the ref.Zanarini, M. C., Frankenburg, F. R., Reich, D. B., Silk, K. R., Hudson, J. I., & McSweeney, L. B. (2007). The subsyndromal phenomenology of borderline personality disorder: a 10-year follow-up study. American Journal of Psychiatry, 164(6), 929-935.To my knowledge, there is no follow-up study on high functionning BP.But no need to say that this type of investigation would be deeply needed :-)- yoo

There is no research on higher-functioning BPs. It doesn't exist. This population is invisible to 90% of the clinical world, and as they get higher and higher up the food chain there is less and less awareness of this population. In a phone seminar conducted by Robert Friedel, MD (who is on the board of the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder, NEABPD.com) echoed the fact that while this population is "invisible to the clinicial population," every else knows about them.
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sailman


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« Reply #31 on: June 27, 2010, 09:14:13 PM »

I'm not technically an expert but my experience is that it never gets better!
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bpdfriend


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« Reply #32 on: June 29, 2010, 02:47:28 AM »

I'm not technically an expert but my experience is that it never gets better!

You are making a generalized statement about the illness, based upon your experience which is guaranteed to represent the smallest of slices of miniscule percentile of the BPDs in the world. I'm not comfortable with someone saying "it never gets better." That seems like an incredibly irresponsible thing to say, in my opinion.
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Skip
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« Reply #33 on: June 29, 2010, 08:04:39 AM »

There is a lot of conflicting information on this question... so it is probably fair not to generalize.

The first question is - "which behaviors?".   The second questions is "what time period"?

I think the general consensus is that self injury and suicidal ideation often (not always) become less problematic as a person matures (reaches into 30-40s).  There is some consensus that people, in general,  get more difficult to interface with as they age (reach into the 70-80s) and that this is more problematic with people suffering from a PD.  Stress or trauma can makes things worse.

In between these extremes, it most likely varies by the person and the situation.
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Indigo Sky
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« Reply #34 on: July 13, 2010, 03:49:13 PM »

I am wondering if this is just a natural part of all of us when we age. Several older relatives, who I dont believe have PD's, became more ridgid in thinking as they age.

There is also the trait of scepticism increasing in some of us as we age. I know I am guilty of this.

Understand they dont deal with death well (who does?), its a big emotional time for us, for our PD partners, tough, as we age, more of our friends and relatives pass on.
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Jemima
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« Reply #35 on: July 13, 2010, 10:05:25 PM »

I have read that BPD tends to get better with age --- that some people gain emotional maturity over the course of adulthood that most people gain by age 18 --- but truthfully I haven't seen that. My mother "came out of the closet" after my father died five years ago. My mother and father as a unit always drove me crazy ... triangulation, thy name is [Jemima's parents] ... but I think my dad probably tamped down her rages. I never saw her just lose it before he died although she could be unexpectedly mean and nasty, and she definitely always has had a sense of entitlement, and is rigid and hyper-concerned with appearances.

My MIL is about the same as she always was with us ... has quiet periods punctuated by flares of rage and border-lion drama. And always, always, the lying, manipulation, and maliciousness. But if I could get my SILs to be honest, I'm thinking they would say she is worse.

A psychologist friend once told me that my MIL would just get worse with age, "because she will just stop giving a ___." Oh, yeah.
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Blossom
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« Reply #36 on: October 30, 2010, 04:31:19 AM »

What are the studies otherwise showing, though? If you're talking about a young adult who gets diagnosed at the 'right' time and receives appropriate treatment, then i can see how by age 30 or 40, the diagnosis may no longer apply. But like you, i don't see that it's as simple as growing through a phase of some sort. However, it's a reminder of how young people (especially) who have issues (IE self harm) can be mis-diagnosed with BPD and that their own issues may resolve within that time frame. I don't know, i'm rambling, but i am interested to see how others are reaching that conclusion.
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Mr R


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« Reply #37 on: January 15, 2011, 02:57:07 AM »

All the reading I've done recently tends to indicate that from about 40 years onwards you can start to 'grow out of BPD'.

Although they all state, and this is VERY important that Therapy is a total must if you really want to get over it at this age totally.

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Randi Kreger
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« Reply #38 on: January 16, 2011, 08:59:31 AM »

All the reading I've done recently tends to indicate that from about 40 years onwards you can start to 'grow out of BPD'.Although they all state, and this is VERY important that Therapy is a total must if you really want to get over it at this age totally.

If you talk to adult children of BPs--the best place to hear examples of this--they will tell you they don't see much of a lessening.
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Mr R


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« Reply #39 on: January 16, 2011, 12:40:03 PM »

Wouldn't that be a biased population?

My Ex Wife is very high functioning, and is quite normal at times (a mask) but I can see that she is learning to regulate her emotions , at the age she is in life.
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