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Author Topic: 8.03 | Helping our children deal with trauma  (Read 8250 times)
marlo6277
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« Reply #20 on: August 11, 2010, 10:47:19 PM »

Understanding Child Traumatic Stress Brochure:

www.nctsn.org/nctsn_assets/pdfs/edu_materials/Understanding_Child_Traumatic_Stress_Brochure_9-29-05.pdf
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marlo6277
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« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2010, 03:34:20 PM »

From the book: Hope & Healing: A Caregiver's Guide to Helping Young Children Affected by Trauma

https://bpdfamily.com/message_board/index.php?topic=125807.0

Quote
WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ACUTE AND CHRONIC TRAUMA?

Acute trauma is a single traumatic event - such as a serious car accident - taht overwhelms a child's ability to cope.  Chronic trauma (also called complex trauma) means exposure to more than one - often many - traumatic events over time.  Children who live in violent neighbourhoods or violent homes (or both) may experience trauma repeatedly.  A child who lives in an environment that exposes him to the threat of physical and sexual abuse is at great risk for chronic traumatization.  Primary caregivers i these environment often cannot protect the child and his interpersonal world is in a constant state of crises.  He has no holding environment.

Quote
The Impact of Traumatic Events Depends on:

The Child

Age

Developmental stage

Temperament

Developmental delays

History of emotional or behavioural problems

The Traumatic Event

Acute trauma

Chronic trauma

Intensity

Child's proximity to traumatic event

Injury to the primary caregiver

Loss of the primary caregiver

Extent of physical injury to child

The Social Environment

Availability of the parent or other primary caregiver as a support to the child

Ability of the parent or other primary caregiver to help the child cope

Level of family stress and coping ability prior to traumatic event

Ability of the family to cope with current stressors

Family routines and stability

Availability of social supports in the community

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