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Poll
Question: What is your Myers-Briggs personality type. See link for test below. ( ) = percentage in the US population.
ISTJ (11.6%)
ISFJ (13.8%)
INFJ (1.5%)
INTJ (2.1%)
ISTP (5.4%)
ISFP (8.8%)
INFP (4.3%)
INTP (3.3%)
ESTP (4.3%)
ESFP (8.5%)
ENFP (8.1%)
ENTP (3.2%)
ESTJ (8.7%)
ESFJ (12.3%)
ENFJ (2.4%)
ENTJ (1.8%)
---> See first page of thread for data table!

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Author Topic: SELF ASSESSMENT | Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®  (Read 15032 times)
Skip
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« on: July 31, 2007, 03:18:17 PM »


The test contains 48 questions. It is free.
Please enter your score in the survey at the top of this thread!


What is personality? Carl G. Jung's theory of psychological types [Jung, 1971] is the principle behind what we have all come to know as personality types. Jung created three scales and asserted that people either score high or low on each. Isabel Briggs Myers, a researcher and practitioner of Jung’s theory, added a fourth scale [Briggs Myers, 1980] when developing the Myers–Briggs Personality Type Indicator (click to see test) - a tool used by organizations around the world to help people understand and work through the inherent conflict that develop when certain personality types interact.

We have had a lot of discussion about the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® over the years. Many of us are familiar with it.  As you know, this is a personality profiling tool that was originally developed for the workplace but its use has been expanded to examine the natural compatibility of couples and of family members.
 
It will be interesting to see what we can learn about ourselves, our incompatibilities with others, and maybe even something about our community overall here at bpdfamily.

Preliminary Survey Results

May 20, 2011
 
Sensing [73% of US population/ 18% of bpdfamily participants]
 
Paying attention to physical reality, what I see, hear, touch, taste, and smell. I’m concerned with what is actual, present, current, and real. I notice facts and I remember details that are important to me. I like to see the practical use of things and learn best when I see how to use what I’m learning. Experience speaks to me louder than words.
 
Intuition [27% of US population/ 82% of bpdfamily participants]
 
Paying the most attention to impressions or the meaning and patterns of the information I get. I would rather learn by thinking a problem through than by hands-on experience. I’m interested in new things and what might be possible, so that I think more about the future than the past. I like to work with symbols or abstract theories, even if I don’t know how I will use them. I remember events more as an impression of what it was like than as actual facts or details of what happened.


 

See list of all self-assessment surveys
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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2007, 03:24:15 PM »

Hey, I have taken the test and I am a INTP.

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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2007, 03:36:03 PM »

INFJ

I guess I try to appear alot harder than I am (several people here have pointed that out to me)..
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« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2007, 03:45:00 PM »

Try being an ESFP around a BPD.

"ESFPs have very strong inter-personal skills, and may find themselves in the role of the peacemaker frequently. Since they make decisions by using their personal values, they are usually very sympathetic and concerned for other people's well-being. They're usually quite generous and warm. "


I am a giver, she is a taker, I need to socialize and be around people, she ran all my friends off and tried to keep me tied to the sofa. I always want to help people, and she continually used me as her lacky.
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« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2007, 04:18:43 PM »

ENFJ.  I did it in about 5 seconds - and that is the same result I got when I took the full-length test many years ago.  2.5% of the population.  Oy - I'm a minority unto myself!
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« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2007, 05:10:23 AM »

I is an ESFP  Smiling (click to insert in post)
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« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2007, 07:05:51 AM »

WHOA, I'm an ESFP too.

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« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2007, 01:56:22 AM »

INTP the P and J are nearly equal.  That means I will make a list and resent myself for it.

I still think one can apply logic to BPD.  To be sure, it is not normal logic.  Take a weak sense of self, such that you cannot accept that you screwed something up.  Attack, manipulate and brow beat the non so they see they are at fault...(what ever it takes to protect ones sense of self)  Throw in a dash of projection and roll the dice.  Einstein (famous INTP) was wrong.  In the BPD universe, God does play with dice.


.
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« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2007, 02:07:06 AM »

I am a non and:

Extroverted (E) 52.78% Introverted (I) 47.22%

Intuitive (N) 58.82% Sensing (S) 41.18%

Feeling (F) 57.58% Thinking (T) 42.42%

Perceiving (P) 60% Judging (J) 40%


I did this about three years ago, shortly after I met my BPDXW and got almost identical results.

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« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2007, 02:41:14 AM »

I'm an ESTJ
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« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2007, 03:04:00 AM »

ESTP

Well I did this test a couple of times before...

and the only thing that is always the same is the T from Thinking and the S from Sensing

So I am a

*ST*  Smiling (click to insert in post)
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« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2007, 12:59:14 PM »

We did this in pre-marriage counselling, actually.

INTJ

I was told the test results were very balanced on the I/E and J/P distinction, more clear leaning in the T direction, with the N being almost one-sided.



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« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2007, 01:11:46 PM »

INTP here too.  Quite accurate, from reading the description in the other web site.

Scary, as a matter of fact.
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« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2007, 06:28:35 PM »

INTJ here.  Hey, Venzon007!

My I is nearly balanced with my E, too.
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« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2007, 08:20:16 PM »

I've taken this test for years.  Was always an INTP.  Recently changed to an INTJ.  J and P were alwasy close.

I agree with Blair and believe you can apply logic to BPD.  I believe this has alot to do with my tendency to become a doormat.

Ironically, my suspected BPD wife is an ENFJ.  Some descriptions say they are master manipulators  ?.

ugh...

Hello to all my INTJ/P friends!
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« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2007, 08:57:14 PM »

OK, I'm an INFP with a uNPDstbxh and s19 and d16.  Just think, a few months ago, I would have needed an interpreter to read my first sentence.  Apparently, I represent 4.4% of the population...no argument there !
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« Reply #16 on: September 10, 2007, 04:11:28 PM »

Do any of you know your MBPI results?  I am an ENFJ

Just wondering if a certain type of person is more apt to be attracted to those with BPD and others who "need" us.
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« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2007, 05:53:25 PM »

Skip, I'm an INFP. You pose an interesting question here. These are some of the traits of INFP's that might me incompatible with my exBPD:

INFPs, more than other intuitive Feeling types, are focused on making the world a better place for people. Their primary goal is to find out their meaning in life. What is their purpose? How can they best serve humanity in their lives?  

Generally thoughtful and considerate, INFPs are good listeners and put people at ease. Although they may be reserved in expressing emotion, they have a very deep well of caring and are genuinely interested in understanding people. This sincerity is sensed by others, making the INFP a valued friend and confidante.

INFPs do not like conflict, and go to great lengths to avoid it. If they must face it, they will always approach it from the perspective of their feelings. In conflict situations, INFPs place little importance on who is right and who is wrong. They focus on the way that the conflict makes them feel, and indeed don't really care whether or not they're right.

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« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2007, 06:04:16 PM »

I maintain a certification for MBTI and use it extensively in executive and career coaching.  I'm an ENFP.

I'm not sure about the predeliction of a particular type to "fall" for someone with NPD or BPD behaviors.  NFPs definitely are idealistic, but that doesn't seem to be enough to explain why someone ends up with a personality-disordered person.  My husband (INTJ) was the non -- I'm the secondary non -- so it isn't appicable to us.

Any type of validated Jungian-based personality test presents up front that it will NOT measure two things -- maturity and mental health.  I put personality disorders in the mental health category.

In debriefing MBTI or in other types of coaching, I try to be very cognizant of the line between the need for coaching and the need for therapy, and I have several sources for referrals if it tips into the latter.

One thing that one finds with INFPs (in our house, that would be my son and my husband's younger daughter) is that under stress, they go directly to the worst case scenario.  They also tend not to have a breadth of friends but rather focus their relationships on a very few deep friendships.

It may be that it has less to do with whom an INFP is attracted to than to the way the personality type INFP charactertics and how they would manifest in any relationship with anyone, mentally healthy or not.

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« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2007, 06:28:37 PM »

I too am an ENFJ.

True Colours I am an almost 50/50 blue-orange

I do think personality plays a huge role in whom we choose and whom chooses us, so yes, in the romantic or friendship BPD possible relationship it can be a factor.

BUT for those like myself that have had a parent showing BPD behaviour our personalities are not a factor, but the development of those personalties may be existent because of that issue.

An interesting thought

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« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2007, 07:02:26 PM »

Definitions!  These are helpful references.  

I've taken the test many times in the past, but I never realized that it was based on Carl Jung's work.  Apparently the roots of this test come from the 1921 book Psychological Types.  Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter, Isabel Briggs Myers distilled this work down to a personal inventory test during World War II believing that a knowledge of personality preferences would help women who were entering the industrial workforce to identify the sort of war-time jobs where they would be "most comfortable and effective".   This initial questionnaire eventually grew into the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, which was first published in 1962. The MBTI focuses on normal populations and emphasizes the value of naturally occurring differences.




Extraversion or Introversion (E)

Extraversion (E)

I like getting my energy from active involvement in events and having a lot of different activities. I’m excited when I’m around people and I like to energize other people. I like moving into action and making things happen. I generally feel at home in the world. I often understand a problem better when I can talk out loud about it and hear what others have to say.

The following statements generally apply to me:

   I am seen as “outgoing” or as a “people person.”

   I feel comfortable in groups and like working in them.

   I have a wide range of friends and know lots of people.

   I sometimes jump too quickly into an activity and don’t allow enough time to think it over.

   Before I start a project, I sometimes forget to stop and get clear on what I want to do and why.

Introversion (I)

I like getting my energy from dealing with the ideas, pictures, memories, and reactions that are inside my head, in my inner world. I often prefer doing things alone or with one or two people I feel comfortable with. I take time to reflect so that I have a clear idea of what I’ll be doing when I decide to act. Ideas are almost solid things for me. Sometimes I like the idea of something better than the real thing.

The following statements generally apply to me:

   I am seen as “reflective” or “reserved.”

   I feel comfortable being alone and like things I can do on my own.

   I prefer to know just a few people well.

   I sometimes spend too much time reflecting and don’t move into action quickly enough.

   I sometimes forget to check with the outside world to see if my ideas really fit the experience.


Sensing or Intuition    

    

The second pair of psychological preferences is Sensing and Intuition. Do you pay more attention to information that comes in through your five senses (Sensing), or do you pay more attention to the patterns and possibilities that you see in the information you receive (Intuition)?

Everyone spends some time Sensing and some time using Intuition. Don’t confuse Sensing with sensual. They aren’t related.

Take a minute to ask yourself which of the following descriptions seems more natural, effortless, and comfortable for you?

Sensing (S)

Paying attention to physical reality, what I see, hear, touch, taste, and smell. I’m concerned with what is actual, present, current, and real. I notice facts and I remember details that are important to me. I like to see the practical use of things and learn best when I see how to use what I’m learning. Experience speaks to me louder than words.

The following statements generally apply to me:

   I remember events as snapshots of what actually happened.

   I solve problems by working through facts until I understand the problem.

   I am pragmatic and look to the “bottom line.”

   I start with facts and then form a big picture.

   I trust experience first and trust words and symbols less.

   Sometimes I pay so much attention to facts, either present or past, that I miss new possibilities.

Intuition (N)

Paying the most attention to impressions or the meaning and patterns of the information I get. I would rather learn by thinking a problem through than by hands-on experience. I’m interested in new things and what might be possible, so that I think more about the future than the past. I like to work with symbols or abstract theories, even if I don’t know how I will use them. I remember events more as an impression of what it was like than as actual facts or details of what happened.

The following statements generally apply to me:

   I remember events by what I read “between the lines” about their meaning.

   I solve problems by leaping between different ideas and possibilities.

   I am interested in doing things that are new and different.

   I like to see the big picture, then to find out the facts.

   I trust impressions, symbols, and metaphors more than what I actually experienced

   Sometimes I think so much about new possibilities that I never look at how to make them a reality.


Thinking or Feeling    

    

This third preference pair describes how you like to make decisions. Do you like to put more weight on objective principles and impersonal facts (Thinking) or do you put more weight on personal concerns and the people involved (Feeling)?

Don’t confuse Feeling with emotion. Everyone has emotions about the decisions they make. Also do not confuse Thinking with intelligence.

Everyone uses Thinking for some decisions and Feeling for others. In fact, a person can make a decision using his or her preference, then test the decision by using the other preference to see what might not have been taken into account.

Take a minute to ask yourself which of the following descriptions seems more natural, effortless, and comfortable for you?

Thinking (T)

When I make a decision, I like to find the basic truth or principle to be applied, regardless of the specific situation involved. I like to analyze pros and cons, and then be consistent and logical in deciding. I try to be impersonal, so I won’t let my personal wishes--or other people’s wishes--influence me.

The following statements generally apply to me:

   I enjoy technical and scientific fields where logic is important.

   I notice inconsistencies.

   I look for logical explanations or solutions to most everything.

   I make decisions with my head and want to be fair.

   I believe telling the truth is more important than being tactful.

   Sometimes I miss or don’t value the “people” part of a situation.

   I can be seen as too task-oriented, uncaring, or indifferent.

Feeling (F)

I believe I can make the best decisions by weighing what people care about and the points-of-view of persons involved in a situation. I am concerned with values and what is the best for the people involved. I like to do whatever will establish or maintain harmony. In my relationships, I appear caring, warm, and tactful.

The following statements generally apply to me:

   I have a people or communications orientation.

   I am concerned with harmony and nervous when it is missing.

   I look for what is important to others and express concern for others.

   I make decisions with my heart and want to be compassionate.

   I believe being tactful is more important than telling the “cold” truth.

   Sometimes I miss seeing or communicating the “hard truth” of situations.

   I am sometimes experienced by others as too idealistic, mushy, or indirect.


Judging or Perceiving    

    

This fourth preference pair describes how you like to live your outer life--what are the behaviors others tend to see? Do you prefer a more structured and decided lifestyle (Judging) or a more flexible and adaptable lifestyle (Perceiving)? This preference may also be thought of as your orientation to the outer world.

Everyone extraverts some of the time. This pair describes whether you extravert (act in the outer world) when you are making decisions or when you are taking in information.

Some people interact with the outside world when they are taking in information. Whether they use the Sensing preference or the Intuitive preference, they are still interacting in the outside world.

Other people do their interacting when they are making decisions. It doesn’t matter whether they are using a Thinking preference or a Feeling preference; they are still interacting in the outside world.

Everyone takes in information some of the time. Everyone makes decisions some of the time. However, when it comes to dealing with the outer world, people who tend to focus on making decisions have a preference for Judging because they tend to like things decided. People who tend to focus on taking in information prefer Perceiving because they stay open to a final decision in order to get more information.

Sometimes people feel they have both. That is true. The J or P preference only tells which preference the person extraverts. One person may feel very orderly/structured (J) on the inside, yet their outer life looks spontaneous and adaptable (P). Another person may feel very curious and open-ended (P) in their inner world, yet their outer life looks more structured or decided (J).

Don’t confuse Judging and Perceiving with a person’s level of organization. Either preference can be organized.

Take a minute to ask yourself which of the following descriptions seems more natural, effortless, and comfortable for you?

Judging (J)

I use my decision-making (Judging) preference (whether it is Thinking or Feeling) in my outer life. To others, I seem to prefer a planned or orderly way of life, like to have things settled and organized, feel more comfortable when decisions are made, and like to bring life under control as much as possible.

Since this pair only describes what I prefer in the outer world, I may, inside, feel flexible and open to new information (which I am).

Do not confuse Judging with judgmental, in its negative sense about people and events. They are not related.

The following statements generally apply to me:

   I like to have things decided.

   I appear to be task oriented.

   I like to make lists of things to do.

   I like to get my work done before playing.

   I plan work to avoid rushing just before a deadline.

   Sometimes I focus so much on the goal that I miss new information.

Perceiving (P)

I use my perceiving function (whether it is Sensing or Intuition) in my outer life. To others, I seem to prefer a flexible and spontaneous way of life, and I like to understand and adapt to the world rather than organize it. Others see me staying open to new experiences and information.

Since this pair only describes what I prefer in the outer world, inside I may feel very planful or decisive (which I am).

Remember, in type language perceiving means “preferring to take in information.” It does not mean being “perceptive” in the sense of having quick and accurate perceptions about people and events.

The following statements generally apply to me:

   I like to stay open to respond to whatever happens.

   I appear to be loose and casual. I like to keep plans to a minimum.

   I like to approach work as play or mix work and play.

   I work in bursts of energy.

   I am stimulated by an approaching deadline.

   Sometimes I stay open to new information so long I miss making decisions when they are needed.








Information Pages in the Thread

Here is the link to the test      

Trait Definitions (Introversion, Extroversions, Sensing, Thinking, etc.) <click here>

Profiles Descriptions (ENTJ, ESTP, etc) <click here>

Compatibility Profiles <click here>

Incompatibility Profiles <click here>

Data Summary <click here>
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« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2007, 07:18:47 PM »

Skip,

I have heard that MB is a pseudo-scientific abstraction with little real value.

What I find interesting about all this is that my BP ex was a MB nut and would spend hours perusing MB books to determine her personality type, my personality type, and whether or not we were a compatible team. (It always came back as a perfect match, LOL).

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« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2007, 07:38:27 PM »

This question has been asked before, here are a few past topics on the subject.  I believe I am INFP.  I believe my stbxW was the opposite.  Scientifically, it has been questioned as to how reliable this test is.  While enlightening, some people can retest and come up slightly differently.  No doubt some of that is due to factors such as our natural tendencies (internal) and our environment (external).

Extroverted (E) 52.78% Introverted (I) 47.22%

Intuitive (N) 58.82%   Sensing (S) 41.18%

Feeling (F) 57.58%     Thinking (T) 42.42%

Perceiving (P) 60%     Judging (J) 40%

www.personalitypage.com/

www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myers-Briggs

I have also heard of the Big 5 Personality Traits

These factors are Neuroticism, Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Openness to Experience.

From the Five Factor Model (FFM): surgency, agreeableness, dependability, emotional stability, and culture.

www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_five_personality_traits
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« Reply #23 on: September 11, 2007, 09:25:06 PM »

There are numerous personality tests and tendency tests of all types.  I don't look at validity studies for training and coaching as harshly as I do for those used as hiring indicators.  Most of the time, I'm looking for a basis to start a conversation on whatever the person I'm coaching needs to talk about.

I do have a problem with people who excuse behaviors because "Oh, I'm this type, or that type."  Big difference between personality tendencies and chosen behaviors.

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« Reply #24 on: September 13, 2007, 03:02:32 PM »

I believe there is validity in trying to understand a BPD SO in light of how the MB's traits amplify the disfunctional dance.

My case in point: My uBPDh is very much the Thinking Judging type, and I am an Intuitive, Feeling, Perceiving type. I realize that his negative BPD traits affect me too much because I run everything through a "meaning" filter. It tends to make me overly sensitive to many of his nonsensical comments or (re)actions.

We recently married after over five years as a couple (both in our 50's). We do not live together, as we have homes near each other, but we enjoy many activities together. I have committed to working on my own issues while mitigating the hurt inflicted by the BPD behaviors. Not easy, but I believe it is worth the effort.

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