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Family Court Strategies: When Your Partner Has BPD OR NPD Traits. Practicing lawyer, Senior Family Mediator, and former Licensed Clinical Social Worker with twelve years’ experience and an expert on navigating the Family Court process.
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Author Topic: Fascinating videos on Psychopaths..  (Read 13761 times)
MM
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« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2011, 08:53:56 PM »

Going to watch it again... . 
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« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2011, 10:45:04 PM »

I believe there's a big difference between "psychopaths" and those with BPD.  THeir behavior may manifest the same way (manipulation, control, rage, cold, distant, etc.) but their reasons for doing so and their reactions and emotions are very different. 

When I see the word "psychopath" I think of 'antisocial personality disorder' which is different in the DSM IV from borderline personality disorder.

When thinking of BPDS and antisocials, I think of a spectrum of emotions.   

antisocials< _____hitnons______nons__________nonPLEASE READ_________ >BPDs

Most of us in the "normal" range (whatever that is) with emotions towards another fall in the middle--- we usually have empathy towards another, hurt if we see someone else hurt, want to help another if they are in need, react to a slight by a friend or family member as "having an off day", etc.  Antisocials/ psychopaths have no feelings whatsoever about these things and or people.  They are devoid of most if any feeling or interelatedness towards another person unless it's a means to an end for their own satisfaction, success, or to appease boredom.   

BPDs on the other hand, I believe, feel emotions so intensly it can be off the charts. They take things so personally and work hard to protect themselves against perceived threats and of feeling that "off the chart" sensation of emotions.  This behavior can manifest in ways similar to the psychopath in coldness, manipulation, rage, double crossing another, stuffing their feelings down inside, etc.   The behavior may appear similar but the motivation (and emotions) behind the behavior is vastly different.

A good book I just read (and would recommend) for those who want to read more about "psychopaths" is 'The Sociopath Next Door'  by Martha Stout. 

It has been said on many threads throughout here that psychopaths/ antisocials are often mistaken for BPDs. 

Thank you for the link!
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« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2011, 10:47:32 PM »

Finally SOLD... .THANK YOU!  And loast for starting the topic... .I love charts!
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« Reply #33 on: March 11, 2011, 08:57:41 AM »

FYI-  Men are significantly misdiagnosed when it comes to BPD... .the stigma is attached to women.


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« Reply #34 on: March 22, 2011, 01:51:35 AM »

After i broke up with my uBPD xbf he confessed to molesting his little brother when he was 15 and his little brother was 5. he said he knew it was wrong but he did it anyway. Does that make him a phsycopath?
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« Reply #35 on: April 11, 2011, 10:40:39 AM »

I agree with alig2's concept of a pwBPD being on the the opposite end of the spectrum from a psychopath when it comes to feeling feelings. 

But what about empathy?  Do you all think that a pwBPD is capable of true empathy?  In my case, my BPDexbf struggled with feeling empathy as a natural emotion.  I think he was born with a potential to be a "whole" individual with depth and warmth and this is the persona he generally puts out there unless he is in an intimate r/s which leaves him feeling "exposed".  B/c he suffered hideous, severe physical  abuse at the hands of a true "melevolent" psychopath, my ex learned to dissociate from his feelings, including empathy.  One of his most vivid memories is when he was 5 and his father shot his two precious little cats in front of him for "getting into the shed and getting the deer meat".

Well anyway, gotta run.  But curious about other's opinions.

R
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« Reply #36 on: April 13, 2011, 11:33:36 PM »

For those interested in research findings on the subject:

Psychopathy in women

www.lovefraud.com/blog/2009/05/02/sssp-meeting-highlights-psychopathy-in-women/

SSSP meeting highlights: Psychopathy in women

The Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy met in New Orleans, LA April 16-18, 2009. There were several hot topics discussed at the meeting including how psychopathy might be different in men and women. The general consensus seemed to be that psychopathy is under-diagnosed in women because in women the symptoms are different.

Dr. Edelyn Verona is a, leader in the Society. Her group presented, “An Examination of Borderline Personality Disorder and Secondary Psychopathy Across Genders.” To understand these research findings look at the list of traits below:

Factor 1 Traits (Primary Psychopathy)

• Glib and superficial

• Egocentric and grandiose

• Lack of remorse or guilt

• Lack of empathy

• Deceitful and manipulative


• Shallow emotions

Factor 2 Traits (Secondary Psychopathy)

• Impulsive

• Poor behavior controls


• Need for excitement

• Lack of responsibility

• Early behavior problems

• Adult antisocial behavior


Dr. Verona’s group looked at the relationship between borderline personality (BPD) traits Factor 1 and Factor 2 in women. They stated, “We hypothesized that gender would moderate the relationship between secondary psychopathic characteristics and features, such that Factor 2 would correlate more strongly with BPD in women than in men. We further expected that primary psychopathic characteristics would be negatively related to BPD.”

The first part of their hypothesis turned out to be supported, that is Factor 2 was associated with BPD in both men and women but more so women.

More important though, is that the second part of their hypothesis was not supported. Primary psychopathic features were positively related to BPD and “F2 was significantly more predictive of BPD in high F1 women relative to low F1 women.”

The authors concluded, “In particular, the combination of F1 and F2 seems predictive of BPD in women, but not men. This suggests that psychopathy (which is typically defined as being high on both F1 and F2) is manifested as BPD in women.”

Their conclusions are supported by other studies showing a positive correlation between psychopathy and BPD scores.


I spoke with Dr. Verona about their findings, commenting that many psychiatrists consider BPD to be a mood or anxiety disorder. She answered that the criteria for BPD are not precise enough. A woman with PTSD and/or mood symptoms can be diagnosed with BPD if she is also impulsive. It does not seem fitting to group these women together with psychopathic women, especially since the treatment may be different for those who have mood/anxiety disorders.

What does this all mean for you who have family members or co-workers with BPD? My advice is consider the degree of harm done by the person in the context of Factor 1 and Factor 2 traits. The more a woman or man has BOTH sets of traits, the more dangerous she/he is likely to be.
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« Reply #37 on: April 14, 2011, 01:50:43 AM »

I'm starting to believe this

My ex definitely showed extreme psychopathy, especially after I was devalued and abandoned. Cold, heartless, inhuman behavior.
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« Reply #38 on: April 15, 2011, 01:33:44 AM »

great videos
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« Reply #39 on: April 15, 2011, 07:18:00 AM »

A recent study has highlighted a strong link between BPD & psychopathy in women in particular...

An Examination of Borderline Personality Disorder and Secondary Psychopathy Across Genders by Dr. Edelyn Verona.

Verona was writing about incarcerated females, already in jail for violent behaviors- hence the secondary psychopathy. Most of the posters on the forum are not dating or married to incarcerated females, already in jail for violent behaviors. They are, however, prone to splitting their partner from good into bad to offset self directed anger. Everybody does this when they get past denial. I know I did. (denial, anger, bargaining, acceptance) So it's one of the first stages to go through when recovering from the aftermath of a Borderline relationship. It's quite common to think of this person as evil and heartless.  Once you understand the disorder, and go through the bargaining of getting them therapy and failing - you'll emerge with an acceptance- that the disorder is here to stay and there's nothing that you can do about it. It's out of your hands.  When you stop personalizing it, it *just *is* but it's not on a par with serial killers who enjoy killing.  It's BPD, the failure to separate/individuate as a human being; the failure to emerge as a stand alone "self" without attaching to others.

People with BPD can certainly manipulate us and become vulnerable seducers, but it's for attachment. Borderlines feel like they are dying without another person to attach to. It is as real to them as a near death experience. These fearful feelings about dying alone (from early childhood) were never given a chance to regulate. Nor were they taught to self-soothe- so naturally, they look to others to help process their discomfort as adults. Unfortunately, they choose partners that trigger the same responses (shame, disbelief, blame, etc.) to their fears of engulfment and abandonment as their earliest attachments. You have to be a fairly important person in the Borderline's life to get in so deep.

Borderlines choose people *to represent* the initial parenting style of their earliest attachments- whether good or bad, this person is *perceived* to be discounting and shaming- which activates the persecution response.  This fear of engulfment IS required of the disorder and the Borderline impulsively flees. (The BPD partner never learns to self soothe and cannot stay with a partner who triggers the anxiety.) The BPD feelings of engulfment are a self-fulfilling prophecy to the desire to attach. The pendulum swings back and forth, but never at rest- happy and secure. There's always fear. Unless the Borderline learns to resolve their compulsive memories and stops projecting them onto the next partner in order to continue the imprint of bondage and mistrust, the disorder will play over and over, back and forth, again and again.

Are Borderlines psychopaths? No. They do not take glee from harming people. Psychopaths do.  Most Borderlines are in pain.

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« Reply #40 on: April 15, 2011, 07:40:18 AM »

"Unfortunately, they choose partners that trigger the same responses (shame, disbelief, blame, etc.) to their fears of engulfment and abandonment as their earliest attachments."

What does this mean?  Does this somehow mean we are bad or negative to a person with BPD?  Many of us were kind to our exBPD partners?  How do we trigger responses of shame, disbelief and blame?  Are we at fault?
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« Reply #41 on: April 16, 2011, 11:16:47 AM »

I'm not thinking I am at fault but I would like to know more.
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« Reply #42 on: April 16, 2011, 11:24:22 AM »

My exuBPD boyfriend molested his little brother when he was 15 and the little brother was 5 years old. Does that make him more like a physcopath?
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« Reply #43 on: April 16, 2011, 07:07:03 PM »

hi all,

what about a hint on the subject in thread... .

who is who in this one, by our awsome mr bob... .

www.youtu.be/7TbmP2vXeQs

wl
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« Reply #44 on: April 16, 2011, 07:35:15 PM »

mm,

you're not at fault. but you may have contributed in ways you couldn't see or have no idea about. in retrospect, i certainly did.

for example, every time my ex was lonely and needy, and i was exhausted and perhaps a bit indifferent, after 3 years.

these people have perceptions that are very different than ours. you could have been a saint, and your ex may have PERCEIVED any one of the actions you took completely differently.

toward the end, i was ignoring my exes daily pleas for me to come over, because i just flat out couldn't. but she was interpreting this as the same behavior her dad had given her. i was abandoning her. she wasn't getting what she needed. i contributed without even knowing it.

were you not ever accused or attacked for something that completely blew your mind, something you weren't at all guilty of, something that didn't even happen? that's what was going on. they interpret. and perceive. and they think in distorted ways. again, no you're not at fault, but without having the foggiest idea, yes, we can trigger responses of shame, disbelief, and blame, among other things. and they will be SO CERTAIN of these things as to see them as indisputable fact.

marcie,

haven't you ever done anything you knew was wrong? especially at the age of 15? everyone has. that alone doesn't make a psychopath, no. it certainly makes him a very troubled individual.
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     and I think it's gonna be all right; yeah; the worst is over now; the mornin' sun is shinin' like a red rubber ball…
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« Reply #45 on: April 16, 2011, 07:35:40 PM »

hi all,

this is the ultimate professor on psychopaty, read mr. hare and educate... .




If you have been in a relationship (preferably with a diagnosed anti-social, sociopath, psychopath or one with psychopathic tendencies) please contact us at: HowToSpot(at)yahoo.com.

Materials will be sent to you. Thank you.

Mask of Sanity by Hervey Cleckley PDF - book download FREE!

"Stanley," a chapter from Hervey M. Cleckley's classic study of psychopaths, The Mask of Sanity


Discover the Secret History of the World - and how to get out alive!

The Psychopath: The Mask of Sanity Special Research by Quantum Future School  

Discussion of Psychopathy Traits From The Mask of Sanity by Hervey Cleckley  

Psychopathy vs. Antisocial Personality Disorder and Sociopathy: A Discussion by Robert Hare  

A Basic Hypothesis of Psychopathy From The Mask of Sanity by Hervey Cleckley  

The Inner Landscape of the Psychopath - Hervey Cleckley

How Psychopaths View Their World

The Psychopath As Physician The Mask of Sanity - Hervey Cleckley - Excerpts  

Political Ponerology: A Science on The Nature of Evil adjusted for Political Purposes by Andrew M. Lobaczewski

with commentary and additional quoted material

by Laura Knight-Jadczyk

The Psychopath in History  

New! The Generation of Evil on The Macrosocial Scale  

Official Culture - A Natural State of Psychopathy? by Laura Knight-Jadczyk  

Construct Validity of Psychopathy in a Community Sample

Psychopaths: Wolves In Sheep's Clothing  

Eight Ways To Spot Emotional Manipulation  

Invicta: MA Counseling and Narcissist Support Groups

The Serial Bully  

Love Fraud  

THE PSYCHOPATH NEXT DOOR... .

PSYCHOPATHS AMONG US

Predators by Robert Hare  

An Interview With Martha Stout  

Martha Stout's Website

Profile of the Psychopath by Hare

The Psychopathic Personality

The Psychopath Defined  

Dr. Robert Hare Profile and Work  

ANTISOCIAL PERSONALITY, SOCIOPATHY, AND PSYCHOPATHY

Sociopathic Parenting  

Bullying behavior may be genetic, a study in twins finds

The Partial Psychopath  

Psychopath's Find Faces a Mystery  

Psychopathy and Antisocial Personality Disorder: A Case of Diagnostic Confusion

Don Juan as Psychopath  

Psychopathy and the DSM-IV  

Ten Minute Test for Psychopathy  

Scientists search for the seat of evil

Functional Families, Dysfunctional Brains

Speech Patterns Offer Windows into Psychiatric Disorders  

Psychopathic Personality  

The Psychopathic Tendency in World Politics

Psychological and Biological theories of criminal conduct.

The Origins of Violence:

Is Psychopathy an Adaptation?

Seeing Evil  

The Psychology of Evil  

Beyond Therapy: Some Evil Can't Be Cured  

Violence as Secular Evil  

Kubrick's Psychopaths Society and Human Nature in the Films of Stanley Kubrick

The Bad Seed: The Fledgling Psychopath

Sam Vaknin Revisited

An In-Depth Look At Where Sam Vaknin is Leading NPD

The Ambassador of Narcissism: An Interview with Sam Vaknin

A Soul With No Footprints

Antisocial Personality, Sociopathy, and Psychopathy  

Narcissism

Anatomy of Malignant Narcissim

The Socially Adept Psychopath

The Origins of Violence: Is Psychopathy an Adaptation?

Bush isn't a moron, he's a cunning sociopath

The Partial Psychopath

 

The Links Below Are All QFG related Psychopathy Experience and Research  

Retreat from Zaca - (3 files)

Dr. Strange, New Age Grifter or COINTELPRO?

":)r. Strange" - Psychotherapist or Hacker and Thief?  

Is Truth Defamatory?  

Maynerd Most's Rebuttal  

Maynerd Most's post to the Cassiopaea Guestbook

"I am the webmaster for Zecharia Sitchin... ."

What is Laura Hiding? The Cassiopaeans Answer  

Reader's Comments on "Is Laura Hiding Something?"

Adventures with Cassiopaea by Laura Knight-Jadczyk  

Reader's Comments on Adventures With Cassiopaea

Ark and Laura's Correspondence 1997 (8 files) Supplement to Adventures

Transcript of direct channeling via "Frank Scott" on computer, July 22, 1994 Supplement to Adventures With Cassiopaea  

Mirror, Mirror On The Wall - Quantum Future School  

the "Alvin Wiley" correspondence (10 files)

Letters from Readers About "Alvin Wileyr

Dear Webmaster: - (2 files)

Statement by Terry and Jan Rodemerk

Death Threat?

Vincent Bridges, Jay Weidner: Magickal Mystery Tour Scam

Is Cassiopaea a Cult?

The French Connection by Laura Knight-Jadczyk Censored!

Organic Portals: The Other Race Quantum Future School (2 files)

Montalk.net Disclaimer

 

“A favored technique is to debilitate your identity [personally, I hate the term self-esteem] by levelling false accusations and/or questioning your honesty, fidelity, trustworthiness, your “true” motivations, your “real” character, your sanity and judgement.”

 

“They are absolutely the world’s best manipulators, liars, and fabricators of truth. They do so convincingly because they believe their own lies. After all their life is nothing but a lie, a sham, how can we possibly assume they know anything different.”

 

“Others around me would get so tired of the whole thing and insinuate that I was perpetuating things. All I wanted was for him to leave me alone. Part of the hurt and damage was done because others could but would not see what was actually happening. He would always try to ingratiate himself to others it was sickening. Usually psychopaths put on the nicest act, and you look like the harpy and btch, and so everyone takes their side, it is a horror story, a psychopath can be very charming, and manipulative and manipulate the smartest of people.”

 

“My biggest frustration and source of anger, is at those who have refused to take a stand when they see the abuse . No matter how outrageous his behavior others often stood by and inadvertently fuelled his grandiosity and denial... .although denial is too mild a word for it.  

 

 

“I have finally come to the conclusion that they cannot change, so all we can do is to refuse to participate in their sick drama and leave the stage.”

 

 

The material presented in the linked articles does not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of the editors. Research on your own and if you can validate any of the articles, or if you discover deception and/or an obvious agenda, we will appreciate if you drop us a line! We often post such comments along with the article synopses for the benefit of other readers. As always, Caveat Lector!  

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE PSYCHOPATH - The Mask of Sanity

Special Research Project of the Quantum Future School


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Imagine - if you can - not having a conscience, none at all, no feelings of guilt or remorse no matter what you do, no limiting sense of concern for the well-being of strangers, friends, or even family members. Imagine no struggles with shame, not a single one in your whole life, no matter what kind of selfish, lazy, harmful, or immoral action you had taken.

And pretend that the concept of responsibility is unknown to you, except as a burden others seem to accept without question, like gullible fools.

Now add to this strange fantasy the ability to conceal from other people that your psychological makeup is radically different from theirs. Since everyone simply assumes that conscience is universal among human beings, hiding the fact that you are conscience-free is nearly effortless.

You are not held back from any of your desires by guilt or shame, and you are never confronted by others for your cold-bloodedness. The ice water in your veins is so bizarre, so completely outside of their personal experience, that they seldom even guess at your condition.

In other words, you are completely free of internal restraints, and your unhampered liberty to do just as you please, with no pangs of conscience, is conveniently invisible to the world.

You can do anything at all, and still your strange advantage over the majority of people, who are kept in line by their consciences will most likely remain undiscovered.

How will you live your life?

it is on cassiopedia.com you find all sbout them. bless

wl
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« Reply #46 on: April 16, 2011, 09:01:39 PM »

There are variations of mental health disorders and emotional disturbance  but there are unique markers of psychopaths.

I was married to a psychopath and sometimes he would discuss with me his experience. He knew he did not experience feelings, he would comment to me occasionally how much he wished he could. He is not afraid of death, is extremely calm in life threatening situations (has rescued people at sea in storms) and never shows emotion in private. His expression is flat or outraged, but never spontaneous. In public he knows  how to act and fit in.

He was very abusive and I was terrified of him.

In public, he is a public figure and a respected man. He lives a shadow life of deceit, financial irresponsibility, and sexual stimulation with numerous partners. He enjoys winning, at any and all costs, and sometimes will wait for years to harm his perceived enemies, usually through the political arena.

Sometimes when he would attack me, he would "blame" me for him having to hurt me, he especially despised me if I showed any emotion, or cried when he abused me. What usually outraged him was the times I would confront him on his behavior, when he could no longer manipulate me. I did not know he was diagnosed prior to our divorce, he had confirmation.

Once you have been subjected to this kind of evil, you never get over it, ever. And you don't mince words, you know what you are up against. It took ten years of planning in order to leave him and seven years to unlock the psychological damage of his abuse.

His T diagnosed him as "failure to bond or attach". I found the papers of his diagnosis locked away in a safe he kept in his office. I did not have the combination of the safe, not for many years.

They are chilling. Chilling in the cunning, shrewdness, ability to inflict harm on others unless they have been socialized in childhood to not harm, and to turn on anyone they view as disposable, and if you met him in public, you would remark to yourself "wow, what a great guy".

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« Reply #47 on: April 16, 2011, 09:30:57 PM »

hi c,

so right, if you had a psychopat near, screwing up your beliefs, and every other sees them as "mr/mrs

nice" not knowing whats behind the mask of insanity, but have you noticed they can´t hold it up for

long as the act is so excusting to them. moreover I was the one who finally got her dx, not to, as they fear most, , to be exposed, but to have her get into dbt-therapy and have an opportunity to heal from all the

bad events in early childhood. but she agreed more to get tested to prowe my disbeliefe about her having a disorder, and once it was documented and ask to take part of the paper, thats where our decade long "relation" started to go south... .as I placed one single boundry, get help and I stand by you all along, but with no self-insight about the disorder and acceptance I had to go, so sad, isn´t it  told her I

prove it to you so if you changed for the best of yourselt, we can have a lunch in a year or three... .

all the best to you

wl
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« Reply #48 on: April 16, 2011, 09:49:44 PM »

Excerpt
if you met him in public, you would remark to yourself "wow, what a great guy".

Yes. And compare that with BPD where Borderlines often present themselves as the ultimate victims.

Excerpt
"Unfortunately, they choose partners that trigger the same responses (shame, disbelief, blame, etc.) to their fears of engulfment and abandonment as their earliest attachments."

What does this mean?  :)oes this somehow mean we are bad or negative to a person with BPD?  Many of us were kind to our exBPD partners?  How do we trigger responses of shame, disbelief and blame?  Are we at fault?

It means that the disorder is there in spite of what did or did not do. It's a personality disorder. It's going to need your acceptance to have you get beyond the bargaining stage that you can overcome it with molding yourself to the behavior of the disorder. When detaching, the bargaining stage is often a review time of what you feel you could have done differently with your own behavioral responses to the disorder- with the mistaken belief that is controllable. (The reality is that it's not.)

Borderline is all about attachment and the false perceptions of control.  The disorder is a belief system that involves persecution for the failure to be a "self." That belief system was in place long before you came onto the scene and it will also remain in place after you say your goodbyes. The fault does not lie in your hands- it is a disorder.

Try to be aware as you detach, that returning to a Borderline after the split will begin the process of their persecutorial thought all over again. The Borderline's longing for love, attachment, feelings of persecution, fear of engulfment/fear of abandonment and subsequent scapegoating of the partner for all the failures *are* the disorder.  If you continue to return for round 5, 6, 7, 8, etc.- you are only facilitating the disorder.

Borderline is the "cant live with you/can't live without you" push and pull- heartbreaking to the partner who senses hope and tries to determine the outcome of the disorder. You can't.  It's a belief system that is borderline to delusional, as the thought process (the belief) makes a Borderline eternally submissive to the perception of a demanding jail warden. Borderline is bondage. Anything you do will be perceived as controlling- even asking them innocently if they would like to brush their teeth in the bathroom before you brush your own. Sad, but true- but it's a disorder. Even Mother Teresa would be split into good/bad. Even the nicest person is split black.  Idea

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« Reply #49 on: April 16, 2011, 11:00:06 PM »

Psychopaths are made in the womb. Brain science has shown through the use of scans that the psychopathic brains differ from brains of people that experience conscience and attachment.

www.google.com/search?q=psychopathic brain scans

Excerpt
The hippocampus plays a critical role in regulating aggression and in learning which situations one should be afraid of - a process called contextual fear conditioning.

With psychopaths, contextual fear conditioning plays a part in learning the concept of what to do and what not to do, Raine said. It has been theorized that the disruption of the circuit linking the hippocampus with the prefrontal cortex could contribute to the impulsiveness, lack of control and emotional abnormalities observed in psychopaths.

“It is learning what is right and what is wrong in a certain situation,” he said.

This does not mean that all people born with these tendencies harm others-rather they have the ability to act without conscience and could cause harm with no remorse, unless they are socialized and nurtured. The nurturing behaviors exhibited by psychopaths are learned-not experienced on an emotional level of bonding and attachment-as a tool of behavior that is acceptable in the community, culture or their family.

Over the years my exh would "show" his remorseless side -not only in his cruelty toward me, but his total absence of emotion or remorse. Our son was in the Intensive Care Unit, we almost lost him. All I could do as he lay there was place my hand to his face and I wept profusely and talked to him to please wake up and stay with us.

His father (myexh) stared at me flatly and without any tone to his voice said "I really wish I could feel what you feel, what does it feel like, to love someone"? Although our son was still in the woods, still in a coma, my exh left after a few hours. His reason? Because he wanted to attend a meeting and he believed the meeting was too important to miss... .not once, did he hold his hand, talk to him, or tell him that he loved him.

His face was calm and void of any emotion-other than a slight annoyance at my son for disrupting his schedule.

I called him when our son woke up. His response, a calm tone as he said "Thank you for calling me with your news". And he hung up.

Although he has never apologized for his cruelty to me, he did once remark, "I know the difference between right and wrong, I know what I did was wrong, during the times I hurt you, it felt not good but like I could do anything and no one would believe you, I don't know how to explain it" and then he said "it was your fault you know, you could have stopped me".

I used to become enraged at him, now I know it is wasted energy. It is as if I am watching a robot in human form.

Psychopathy is different from BPD and it is different from narcissism. 

I don't think we know enough to really be convinced that BPD isn't curable, or an emotional disturbance. I believe there is recovery and a path to emotional health.

I doubt there is such hope for psychopaths, unless science and technology can repair the structure and pathways of the brain.

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